Culture

Electronic Housekeeper monitors water, gas, electricity

Electronic Housekeeper, a CES newbie, has made it possible for homeowners to monitor their water, gas, and electricity. The console can also be used for entertainment--VoIP, text messaging, access to e-mail and the Wweb, and satellite radio.

The touchscreen console also features music, VoIP, streaming television and other downloadable apps. Electronic Housekeeper

Surprises can be fun, but not when it comes to bills. Electronic Housekeeper, a CES newbie, has made it possible for homeowners to monitor their water, gas, and electricity. Knowing which devices are draining the most energy and who's taking the long showers might be the first step toward lower energy bills.

After selling its products in Europe and the Middle East, Denmark-based Electronic Housekeeper will bring its innovations to North America. The company has created a wall-mountable console that communicates wirelessly with electronics, appliances, heating, air conditioning, as well as water and electricity meters.

Monitoring household appliances and devices is familiar, like the Tenrehte PICOwatt, but this technology is one of the first to give consumers regulation of all utilities.

The touch-screen console gives users the ability to review their utility usage, but also energy consumption of devices plugged into "Switchkeepers." The Switchkeepers communicate wirelessly with the main console, allowing consumers to set on/off times for their electronics. There is also the option of controlling and monitoring utilities through a computer, as the system works on the home's wireless network.

Electronic Housekeeper can also be used for entertainment--VoIP, text messaging, access to email and the web, satellite radio, and other add-on services are available for download from what seems like an application store.

The company began development in 2005 and has already sold thousands of units worldwide. Following its success, Electronic Housekeeper will move its headquarters to the United States while maintaining wholly owned subsidiaries worldwide.

Other initiatives include integrating its technology in offices, real estate companies, construction firms, federal agencies, and universities.