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Congress buried in e-mail

E-mail messages to Congress have more than doubled in two years to 80 million in 2000, according to a new study, and are increasing at an average of 1 million additional messages each month. However, the study from the Congress Online Project found that Capitol Hill offices lack the resources to respond to all of the e-mails, alienating constituents. Many of the e-mails, according to the study, come from advocacy groups that organize campaigns of millions of messages, although that contributes to the fact that most of the e-mails a member receives are from outside his or her congressional district. The study suggested congressional offices could become more efficient in responding to e-mail if they didn't insist on sending postal mail in return. The Congress Online Project is funded by the Pew Charitable Trusts.

    E-mail messages to Congress have more than doubled in two years to 80 million in 2000, according to a new study, and are increasing at an average of 1 million additional messages each month. However, the study from the Congress Online Project found that Capitol Hill offices lack the resources to respond to all of the e-mails, alienating constituents. Many of the e-mails, according to the study, come from advocacy groups that organize campaigns of millions of messages, although that contributes to the fact that most of the e-mails a member receives are from outside his or her congressional district. The study suggested congressional offices could become more efficient in responding to e-mail if they didn't insist on sending postal mail in return. The Congress Online Project is funded by the Pew Charitable Trusts.