Tech Industry

Alibaba founder wants counterfeiters punished like drunk drivers

More than 60 percent of fake goods are apparently made in China, and Alibaba founder Jack Ma wants it to stop.

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Alibaba founder Jack Ma is sick of counterfeiters.

Wang HE, Getty Images

Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba is taking its fight against counterfeiters very seriously.

Jack Ma, its founder and executive chairman, took to Weibo -- China's hybrid version of Twitter and Facebook -- on Monday to urge the country's government to treat counterfeiting as seriously as it takes drunk driving.

In a lengthy post addressed to Chinese lawmakers currently at annual legislative sessions, Ma said that stricter laws on drunk driving are perhaps the most "classical law improvements" made in recent years. He urged the government to tackle counterfeits in the same way because they impede innovation and creativity.

The post follows a statement last month, in which Alibaba called for the Chinese government to curb counterfeiting. Of the 4,495 leads tied to counterfeiting identified by Alibaba last year, the company said, only 33 convictions followed.

Around $500 billion worth of fake goods are sold every year, according to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. The group identifies China as the main source, with more than 60 percent of counterfeit goods coming from China.

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