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Britain plans broadband auction

The British government is gearing up to sell off another part of the United Kingdom's radio spectrum in an attempt to boost the availability of wireless broadband Internet access services. The Radiocommunications Agency announced on Monday that it is proposing to hold an auction of licenses in the 3.4GHz spectrum. No date has been set for an auction, but if it does go ahead, the licenses would allow telecom companies to provide always-on, high-speed wireless Internet services and could be a way of bringing broadband to rural areas. Under the plan, 15 licenses will be made available; seven will cover major metropolitan areas within England, Wales and Scotland; seven more will divide up the rest of the mainland U.K.; and one will cover the whole of Northern Ireland. The government will awarded the licenses by an auction process, even though it attracted criticism after its previous auctions. ZDNet U.K.'s Graeme Wearden reported from London. To read the full story, visit ZDNet U.K.

The British government is gearing up to sell off another part of the United Kingdom's radio spectrum in an attempt to boost the availability of wireless broadband Internet access services. The Radiocommunications Agency announced on Monday that it is proposing to hold an auction of licenses in the 3.4GHz spectrum. No date has been set for an auction, but if it does go ahead, the licenses would allow telecom companies to provide always-on, high-speed wireless Internet services and could be a way of bringing broadband to rural areas.

Under the plan, 15 licenses will be made available; seven will cover major metropolitan areas within England, Wales and Scotland; seven more will divide up the rest of the mainland U.K.; and one will cover the whole of Northern Ireland. The government will awarded the licenses by an auction process, even though it attracted criticism after its previous auctions.

ZDNet U.K.'s Graeme Wearden reported from London.

To read the full story, visit ZDNet U.K.