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Bloody 'Power Rangers' fan film returns with age restriction

Producer Adi Shankar's violent new vision of the kiddie franchise "Power Rangers" returns to YouTube after a copyright kerfuffle, but it comes with restrictions.

Power/Rangers screenshot
The Power Rangers are all grown up now. Video screenshot by Amanda Kooser/CNET

A truce seems to have been called in the great "Power Rangers" war of 2015.

Film producer Adi Shankar (known for "Dredd" and "A Walk Among the Tombstones") brought a very different version of the kids' superhero show into existence. Explosions, drugs, guns and flying blood ran rampant across the screen, making this take on the "Power Rangers," which published last week, an adults-only affair.

It didn't take long for Saban, the company behind the original series, to issue copyright-based takedown notices to video-hosting sites Vimeo and YouTube, which pulled the short film within days. It wasn't gone for long. Shankar's "Power/Rangers" returned as of Saturday, but it's now stocked with disclaimers.

Curious viewers must be at least 18 to see it and first have to sign in to YouTube and pass the age-wall test to access the video. The film now starts with a disclaimer:

The following is an independently produced "bootleg universe" video that is not in any way associated with, or endorsed by Saban Brands, SCG Power Ranger LLC or any of their affiliated companies. The video contains graphic violence, nudity, sexual situations & drug use, and is intended for mature audiences only. Viewer discretion is strongly advised.

The Vimeo version of "Power/Rangers" now reads "Unauthorized NSFW bootleg" in the title, but doesn't appear to be behind an age wall. It includes more disclaimers in the description, reading "Deboot of the Power Rangers. My take on the FAN FILM. Not a pilot, not a series, not for profit, strictly for exhibition. This is a bootleg experiment not affiliated or endorsed by Saban Entertainment or Lionsgate nor is it selling any product. I claim no rights to any of the characters (don't send me any money, not kickstarted, this film is free)."

"Power/Rangers" director Joseph Khan told Deadline, "They put these disclaimers on so kids so don't confuse our super-violent film with their Power Rangers brand. There are no hard feelings. We signed contracts. We can play it anywhere we want on all platforms. I think they realized that people just want to see it."