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"Appalled" by Brilliant Digital

A reader writes that Brilliant's piggybacking on the Kazaa file-swapping network goes beyond a privacy issue. He calls it "downright theft."


    "Appalled" by Brilliant Digital

    In response to the April 1 article "Stealth P2P network hides inside Kazaa":

    Thanks for informing the public about what's going on with Kazaa and Brilliant Digital. I'm appalled by Brilliant's comment that there is "no downside" to Kazaa users. Clearly, they've either missed the point or spun a red herring to downplay the attention.

    This goes beyond the privacy issue; this is downright theft. It would be no different than if I were to "borrow your car for a joy ride." I had installed Norton Internet Security, which is supposed to control such interactions, but clearly it missed the interaction of this software with the Internet.

    I suspect Brilliant's comment about its plans to "turn on this software in four to six weeks" is false. I've noticed that my PC has been acting in a very strange way in the last few weeks. I have a new high-end machine with plenty of power, but lately it has been slowing down dramatically with clearly something running in the background that I was not able to trace. After deleting their files per your directions, the performance of the machine "magically" improved. This has to be more than circumstantial. They must have turned this on earlier than announced for either testing purposes or to use it for actual content distribution.

    I'm very concerned about what is going on with all this spyware and unauthorized software installation. I'm surprised that the Windows OS doesn't do more to inform the user and offer ways to control what this software is doing.

    Palo Alto, Calif.



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