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Use Google Music for Android: How To Video

About Video Transcript

How To Video: Use Google Music for Android

3:42 /

Music for Android lets you access on your phone or tablet your music stored in Google's cloud, even if you're offline. Sharon Vaknin shows you how.

-Hey, I'm Sharon Vaknin from cnet.com. I'm here to walk you through Google Music for Android. With Google Music, you can access all your music across multiple devices and computers without burdening your phone or computer storage. Basically, the music stored on Google Servers and playback over Wi-Fi or your song network to your phone. To get a Google Music account, go to music.google.com/music and request and invite. Google is slowly rolling this beta software out, so be patient. Once you've been invited, you will be able to access to Google Music web interface in the browser and download the music manager for your desktop. Music manager will copy all the music on your computer to Google servers and make it all available on your Android phone or tablet when you're not at home, but even without an invite, you can still download the Android app and get to know the interface. Go to the Android market and search for music. It's the app with the headphone's icon. Once it's downloaded and installed, select which Google account you want to use with the app. It's based on what accounts are already connected to your phone. Once you're all set up, the app will automatically load songs from your online library and your phone's internal storage. If you have a huge library because maybe you decided to take advantage of the free storage of 20,000 songs, it might take a while, but once those just populated playing music is pretty straightforward. Just tap a song to begin playing at or hit the arrow to the right of any song and press play. Here, you'll see other options. Make an instant mix is Google's answer to Apple's genius feature. If you select it, Google will create a playlist of songs similar to the one you selected. It's for when you're on the go, wanna take up old music or you just wanna like google work its magic. You can also add a song to the playlist in this menu. You can either add the song to an existing playlist or create a new one. All your playlist is stored in the tab at the top. To create a new one hit the menu button and select new playlist. You can rename it and begin adding songs, albums, or artists through the other tabs. Each tabs menu selection is different. It makes you experience a little frustrating, but the main thing you should know is that the playlist albums and artists' tabs have an option called make available off line. So, now that all your music is stored on google server, how do you access it when you're not connected to the internet? This is where make available offline comes in. Tap that option and you'll see question show up next to the items on the list. Tap the questions next the items what available offline and hit done. The music is cached onto your phone, so the amount of music you can make available offline depends on how much storage you have, and deselect them later to remove them from your phone and free up space. You can check on the download progress by going to menu, settings, then download cue. There are other useful settings here too. Take a look around and contact me on face book if you have any questions, and look, if you rotate the phone to landscape, you get hold different interface. Feel free to choose accordingly. Send you questions, comments, and how to ideas to how at cnet.com and for more handy how to videos head on over to cnettv.com. For CNET, I'm Sharon Vaknin and I'll see you on the interweb.

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