6
This content is rated TV-MA, and is for viewers 18 years or older. Are you of age?
Sorry, you are not old enough to view this content.

How To Video: Use Garmin's Voice Studio software

About Video Transcript

How To Video: Use Garmin's Voice Studio software

2:31 /

CNET's Antuan Goodwin shows you how to ditch those preloaded voice directions with Garmin's new software.

^M00:00:01 [ Music ] ^M00:00:10 >> Are you tired of listening to the pre-recorded voices and robotic text to speech engine on your Garmin Nuvi? Well you can use Garmin's voice studio software to record your own voice profile for turn-by-turn directions on your Windows PC. I'm Antuan Goodwin and let me show you how it's done. You'll need a PC running Windows XP or greater with a microphone and a Garmin Nuvi device. We're using the Nuvi 1690. First make sure that your Garmin Nuvi is compatible with the voice connect software. A full length can be found at www.garmin.com slash voice studio. While you're there go ahead and download and install the voice studio software. Now start up the voice studio software and select File then New Voice from the dropdown menu. Go ahead and give your voice a name and you'll be greeted with a list of spoken phrases that your Nuvi supports. Simply click a phrase, click record and read the phrase into your microphone. Enter round-about. >> Enter round-about. >> Now there about 60 to 65 words and phrases that your GPS device will use to give you turn-by-turn directions and you'll have to re-record all of them which should take about 10 to 15 minutes. You can record as many voices as you want so go ahead and have some fun here. Make a U-turn. >> Make a U-turn. >> Once you're done you can test your new voice to make sure all is well using the text button. >> Take route ahead then turn right. >> If you're happy with the way things sound, connect your Garmin Nuvi to your PC using the USB cable and click the Send to GPS button to finalize and load your custom voice. Now disconnect the Nuvi, fire it up and head to the tools, then settings, then the language menu to select your voice. Now all of your turn-by-turn directions will be read using your recordings. Of course to do so you'll have to give up text to speech so street and poi names won't be read aloud. But this is a great way to break up the monotony of getting from Point A to Point B. >> End one and one-quarter miles. Turn left. >> For cnet.com this is Antuan Goodwin and that's how it's done.

New releases

XCAR Awards 2014: Person of the year
1:41 December 20, 2014
Some incredibly people crossed paths with XCAR in 2014. We look back to see who impressed us most.
Play video
2014 BMW i8 (CNET On Cars, Episode 56)
19:02 December 19, 2014
BMW's i8 is definitely a taste of the future -- but whose? We'll shed some light on MPGe, the benchmark for tomorrow's cars. And we...
Play video
Need a new size? Just tap the mirror
1:55 December 19, 2014
In a place where fashion comes first, tech is coming in at a close second. In major department stores and small boutiques, the dressing...
Play video
Did life forms exist on Mars? Curiosity makes a big find, Ep. 187
4:46 December 19, 2014
It's the last Crave show of 2014. This week, Curiosity makes a huge discovery, the US Navy has a shark drone and American satellites...
Play video
Obama: Sony wrong to pull movie over hackers' threats
2:56 December 19, 2014
President Obama addresses the Sony cyberattack and vows to respond to North Korea. Also, T-Mobile settles cramming lawsuit, and Facebook...
Play video
A cheap activity tracker you will actually want to wear
2:11 December 19, 2014
CNET's Dan Graziano gives you a look at one of the most affordable fitness trackers on the market.
Play video
Embarrassing moments in tech (2014)
2:53 December 19, 2014
The high profile tech of 2014 that aimed for the stars and landed in the gutter.
Play video
Solid tablet design hindered by so-so performance
2:48 December 19, 2014
The Lenovo Yoga Tablet 2 has an excellent ergonomic build, but its performance lacks the same finesse.
Play video