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How To Video: Use Garmin's Voice Studio software

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How To Video: Use Garmin's Voice Studio software

2:31 /

CNET's Antuan Goodwin shows you how to ditch those preloaded voice directions with Garmin's new software.

^M00:00:01 [ Music ] ^M00:00:10 >> Are you tired of listening to the pre-recorded voices and robotic text to speech engine on your Garmin Nuvi? Well you can use Garmin's voice studio software to record your own voice profile for turn-by-turn directions on your Windows PC. I'm Antuan Goodwin and let me show you how it's done. You'll need a PC running Windows XP or greater with a microphone and a Garmin Nuvi device. We're using the Nuvi 1690. First make sure that your Garmin Nuvi is compatible with the voice connect software. A full length can be found at www.garmin.com slash voice studio. While you're there go ahead and download and install the voice studio software. Now start up the voice studio software and select File then New Voice from the dropdown menu. Go ahead and give your voice a name and you'll be greeted with a list of spoken phrases that your Nuvi supports. Simply click a phrase, click record and read the phrase into your microphone. Enter round-about. >> Enter round-about. >> Now there about 60 to 65 words and phrases that your GPS device will use to give you turn-by-turn directions and you'll have to re-record all of them which should take about 10 to 15 minutes. You can record as many voices as you want so go ahead and have some fun here. Make a U-turn. >> Make a U-turn. >> Once you're done you can test your new voice to make sure all is well using the text button. >> Take route ahead then turn right. >> If you're happy with the way things sound, connect your Garmin Nuvi to your PC using the USB cable and click the Send to GPS button to finalize and load your custom voice. Now disconnect the Nuvi, fire it up and head to the tools, then settings, then the language menu to select your voice. Now all of your turn-by-turn directions will be read using your recordings. Of course to do so you'll have to give up text to speech so street and poi names won't be read aloud. But this is a great way to break up the monotony of getting from Point A to Point B. >> End one and one-quarter miles. Turn left. >> For cnet.com this is Antuan Goodwin and that's how it's done.

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