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How To Video: Use Android to play music in your car

About Video Transcript

How To Video: Use Android to play music in your car

3:26 /

CNET's Antuan Goodwin shows you three ways to use your Android phone to play music through your car's stereo.

[ Music ] ^M00:00:09 >> In a market saturated with things that are made for iPod and works with iPhone, Droid users are probably wondering, you know, how can I use my device in my car? Well, chances are you've already got the technology for it. I'm Antuan Goodwin, and I'm gonna show you three different ways to use your Android phone with your car stereo. Now the first way is using the analog audio input. So, what you basically need to do is connect a patch cable to your car into the headphone jack and that will allow you to get an analog audio signal into the stereo. The advantage of this way is that it's the easiest way of doing it. There's just one cable, you plug it up. But the disadvantages are that because you're using analog audio, it may not be the best sound quality. Plus, now you've got two different volumes to contend with, the one on your phone and the one on the dashboard, which brings us to our second way. And that's gonna be Bluetooth audio streaming. The way you do this usually varies from car to car, but the steps usually begin with initiating the pairing procedure on your car stereo. Once you've done that, you're gonna want to go into your Androids menu, select the Bluetooth and make sure it's turned on. Then in the Bluetooth settings, find your car stereo and then initiate the pairing process. It's probably gonna ask you for a PIN. Chances are it's gonna be 0000. And once you've entered that, your Droid will be paired with the car stereo for audio streaming. Now the advantage of doing it this way is that Bluetooth pairing is usually a one-shot deal. And every subsequent time you jump in your car, the pairing should recur automatically. The disadvantage, though, is that Bluetooth, as a wireless protocol, usually is a big battery drain. So you're gonna want to plug into some sort of a power adapter, which kind of defeats the purpose of going wireless in the first place. Now the third way to use your Android phone with your car stereo is connecting via USB. You're gonna want to make sure your car has a USB port and supports USB mass storage devices. Simply take the micro USB cable that came with your Android phone and connect your phone to the USB port. In the top corner of your phone, you'll notice a little USB icon. Pull down your notification bar and hit the USB button. It's gonna ask you if you want to mount your device. So go ahead and hit mount. Once it's done that, your car should recognize your Android phone as a USB mass storage device. The advantage to doing this way is that you gain access to your music using your car stereo's controls. So you can keep your eyes on the road, and if you have a system like Ford SYNC, then you can also use voice command and whatnot. The disadvantages are that because it's reading basically off of your device, you can't use streaming services like Pandora. Or if you're using navigation, you don't get your voice commands through your system. Now there is a fourth way, and that's a combination of any of the three modes we discussed before. The advantage of doing this is that you can jump back and forth between, for example, Bluetooth and USB to take advantage of the strengths of those two different modes with none of the weaknesses. So that's been three different ways to use your Android phone with your car stereo. I'm Antuan Goodwin. And that's how it's done. ^M00:03:22 [ Music ]

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