CNET News Video: U.S. weaves port surveillance web
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CNET News Video: U.S. weaves port surveillance web

2:17 /

Eighty-two surveillance cameras will be watching the perimeter of one of the busiest shipping ports in Northern California. CNET News.com's Kara Tsuboi toured the Richmond facility and reports on the new wireless mesh security system.

[ background music ] >> I'm Kara Suboy, cnetnews.com. I'm here at the Port of Richmond, one of the largest shipping ports in all of northern California, where they've just installed a brand new, state of the art wireless mesh security system. >> This is basically little clusters of cameras that go around approximately fifteen miles of perimeter. >> Eighty two cameras to be exact, all keeping a watchful eye from as far as a mile away on possible intruders, people loitering, or mysterious objects left behind. >> And this is our guy that's just violated this alarm. >> Like in this simulation, basically anything that can trigger the virtual trip wires and set off an alarm. >> So you're looking at a license plate, you're looking at that back hall. But you can, these cameras you can zoom in and zoom out on screen basically at will. >> What we have is an integration between the analytic software to the graphic interface software. And what this has done is it just gives him that single screen that he looks at for alarm events, no matter what kind of alarm events they are. >> At a recent media tour, Jeff Gutierrez with ADT explains that data moves from the cameras to thirty one wireless radios through a one gigabit back hall feed, the server is in the Port security office. >> You got two little racks that basically you've got seventy three terabytes of data storage, you've got the analytic sitting right next to it. >> Ultimately law enforcement dispatch centers will be able to pick up the feed directly. >> When you talk about a trip wire, you draw where you want that thing basically to be. >> At this point the system, costing 2.3 million dollars in Homeland Security grant money is set up for perimeter detection only. One day ADT says it could some day expand to cover incoming cargo ships, provide sound, or even link in and access components. >> When they're ready to have these applications added, you know, we'll be able to go with the network, the communications that we've established here, expanded. >> ADT says this is the first security system of its kind, but will now be used as a model for future Port security systems across the world. I'm Kara Suboy, cnetnews.com ^M00:02:11 [ music ]

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