6
This content is rated TV-MA, and is for viewers 18 years or older. Are you of age?
Sorry, you are not old enough to view this content.

First Look: The Philips Hue Tap puts power in your fingertips

About Video Transcript

First Look: The Philips Hue Tap puts power in your fingertips

1:48 /

This new wireless remote promises to control your Philips Hue LEDs, and it needs no battery.

I'm CNet's Ry Crist and this is the Philips Hue Tap, they remote control for your Philips Hue lighting. You can put it on the wall or stick it in your pocket or leave it out on the coffee table and you'll have a series of buttons you can press to trigger your hue light. Now, the Philips Hue Tap gives you four buttons in total to control your lights with. There are these three buttons on the face of the device. And then the face of device is a fourth button itself. Now that gives you the option to turn one light off or turn one light on. Or turn an entire scene of lights on or off. So if I press this button, I get this light turning purple. If I press this button, I get all the lights turning red. And then similarly, if I press the third button, I turn off just one light, and if I press the big fourth button here, I turn off all the lights. And that's really it. You just turn your lights on and off with this thing, so it's a pretty simple device, and it costs $60, which might be a bit steep for some. But if you've got an existing use setup and you've got a lot of lights you like to control, I think having the practicality of a physical remote is a really nice touch. One thing though, this things called the Phillips Hue Tap, but it's gonna take a bit more than a tap to get these buttons to work. If you just press them down, they'll click, but they won't necessarily work. You have to press and then give it a little extra oomph in order to get the entire face of the button down before they'll work. The reason for that is that the Hue Tap doesn't use any batteries, it actually runs off of the kinetic power generated each time you press a button. That's a really cool feature. You don't have to change batteries. You don't have to worry about charging it. But it does mean that it's not quite as usable as you might like. All in all, though, I like this device a lot. I wish it cost a little less than $60, but it's still pretty cool, and if you have an existing Philips [UNKNOWN] setup, you're gonna like being able to control your lights without having to fish your phone outta your pocket for c net, I'm Rye Chris.

New releases

How to play Aprils Fools' Pac-Man in Google Maps
1:56 March 31, 2015
Clear all the power pellets in your town with Pac-Man for Google Maps just in time for April Fools Day!
Play video
The Samsung Galaxy S6 gets dropped and dunked
4:25 March 31, 2015
The Galaxy S6 is getting great reviews, but its also getting tortured. YouTube is rolling out 4K video and eSports will be a big part...
Play video
2015 Chevrolet Trax LS
5:00 March 31, 2015
Chevy's newest SUV and its smallest.
Play video
Jay Z's Tidal music service makes star-studded splash
1:14 March 31, 2015
Alicia Keys joined rap mogul Jay Z, Madonna and other music icons to introduce Tidal, what they call the first artist-owned streaming-music...
Play video
Amazon Dash Buttons may be the future of grocery shopping
2:53 March 31, 2015
Running low on something? Put an Amazon Dash Button in your home to instantly order more. Also Google makes a bigger push for Chrome...
Play video
Hisense's Chromebook is portable, light and only $149
1:48 March 31, 2015
This new budget Chromebook is perfect for students.
Play video
What is the Turing Test?
1:54 March 31, 2015
You've probably heard of the Turing Test for artificial intelligence, but how does it work? And what does it mean if a robot passes...
Play video
On the road: Mercedes F 015
5:53 March 31, 2015
Brian Cooley rides in the Mercedes F 015 self-driving concept vehicle and explains how we'll live with cars in the future.
Play video