6
This content is rated TV-MA, and is for viewers 18 years or older. Are you of age?
Sorry, you are not old enough to view this content.

First Look: The Philips Hue Tap puts power in your fingertips

About Video Transcript

First Look: The Philips Hue Tap puts power in your fingertips

1:48 /

This new wireless remote promises to control your Philips Hue LEDs, and it needs no battery.

I'm CNet's Ry Crist and this is the Philips Hue Tap, they remote control for your Philips Hue lighting. You can put it on the wall or stick it in your pocket or leave it out on the coffee table and you'll have a series of buttons you can press to trigger your hue light. Now, the Philips Hue Tap gives you four buttons in total to control your lights with. There are these three buttons on the face of the device. And then the face of device is a fourth button itself. Now that gives you the option to turn one light off or turn one light on. Or turn an entire scene of lights on or off. So if I press this button, I get this light turning purple. If I press this button, I get all the lights turning red. And then similarly, if I press the third button, I turn off just one light, and if I press the big fourth button here, I turn off all the lights. And that's really it. You just turn your lights on and off with this thing, so it's a pretty simple device, and it costs $60, which might be a bit steep for some. But if you've got an existing use setup and you've got a lot of lights you like to control, I think having the practicality of a physical remote is a really nice touch. One thing though, this things called the Phillips Hue Tap, but it's gonna take a bit more than a tap to get these buttons to work. If you just press them down, they'll click, but they won't necessarily work. You have to press and then give it a little extra oomph in order to get the entire face of the button down before they'll work. The reason for that is that the Hue Tap doesn't use any batteries, it actually runs off of the kinetic power generated each time you press a button. That's a really cool feature. You don't have to change batteries. You don't have to worry about charging it. But it does mean that it's not quite as usable as you might like. All in all, though, I like this device a lot. I wish it cost a little less than $60, but it's still pretty cool, and if you have an existing Philips [UNKNOWN] setup, you're gonna like being able to control your lights without having to fish your phone outta your pocket for c net, I'm Rye Chris.

New releases

Instant smartphone printers
1:37 March 4, 2015
Instant printers are the new Polaroids. Check out these top 3 that connect to your smartphone, giving you a paper print out in min...
Play video
What's free on Xbox and PlayStation: March 2015
1:41 March 4, 2015
Check out the free games for March 2015 available on the Xbox Live Games with Gold and PlayStation Plus subscription services.
Play video
Uh oh, it's PonoPlayer!
1:55 March 4, 2015
While it has its faults the distinctive and fun PonoPlayer offers a taste of high-end audio
Play video
This pocketwatch smartphone is designed with inner peace in mind
1:24 March 4, 2015
We get our hands on a prototype of Runcible, an oddly-shaped phone designed to be less distracting and intrusive than regular mobi...
Play video
Firefox phones range from high end to super, super affordable
1:19 March 4, 2015
Why would you want a browser-based phone like a FireFox phone? Maybe because costs as little as $23. A look at three phones for Japan,...
Play video
We experienced the future of VR with HTC Vive
2:55 March 4, 2015
What does HTC and Valve's new VR gaming hardware do? We tried it out and were blown away.
Play video
LifeBEAM Smart Hat checks heart rate on your head
0:54 March 4, 2015
It's a hat. It's a heart rate hat. Why? Well, see for yourself. Heads-on in Barcelona.
Play video
High-tech dog collar does bark notification and streaming video
1:34 March 4, 2015
Motorola's Scout 5000 and Scout 2500 get you more data on your dog. Hit play to find out more.
Play video