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How To Video: Stream media from a PC to a Kindle Fire

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How To Video: Stream media from a PC to a Kindle Fire

3:44 /

Make all the media on your PC available on your Kindle Fire, whether you're in the same room or halfway around the world, using a handy remote desktop app.

Speaker 1: Amazon's Kindle Fire is putting a tablet in the hands of a lot of folks who couldn't justify Apple's 5 to $800.00 price tag and the main play on the Kindle is simpler as well. It's all about media. Audio, video, web, e-books but what if the media you want isn't on your Kindle Fire, it's on your PC. There's a way to get it there with a remote desktop app. I'm Brian Cooley here to show you how to use your Kindle Fire to access stuff on your computer remotely. For this project, you'll need of course a Kindle Fire and a PC either Windows or Mac and it needs to be connected online. There needs to be WiFi access for your Kindle Fire because that's the only kind that understands and we'll need a remote desktop app installed both on the Kindle and also on the desktop. There are a handful of remote apps available in the Kindle Fire's (curated?) Android app store. We're going to use Splash Top as an example. It does cost 3 bucks while some others are free but I've had good results with Splash Top and it has a high number of enthusiastic user reviews. First, go to the apps tab on the Kindle Fire and search for remote desktop in the store area. You'll see all your choices there, about 8 of them. Click on Splash Top remote and then authorize the purchase and install it. Now, go to your computer and install the free desktop component, which is called the Splash Top Streamer. You can find that at splashtop.com/streamer... install that (??) an access code custom to you, which you will also enter on your Kindle Fire to authorize these two to talk to each other. Now there are 2 ways to connect them. One, is when you're on the same LAN or local network, that would be like when you're home for example and it's easy, you just go to your Kindle and you hit the plus sign to add a computer and then type in the IP or internet address on your home network of the computer you wanna access. Now, over the internet it's a little more tricky but luckily, you can use Splash Top's Finder which is very helpful. What you do is you log in on both the computer and the Kindle Fire with your Google account and Splash Top will be able to put the two together and automatically find them over the internet. It's a nice tool that keeps you out of the (??) of network address translation and port forwarding and all kinds of nasty stuff. Now you can see and hear what's on your PC or Mac on your Kindle Fire live from anywhere. You can play a video or listen to audio, your music collection and I find the audio and video sync is pretty good as long as your WiFi connection on the Kindle is good and solid. Speaker 2: And Brian Cooley is (the editor?) at large for cnet.com. You hear about some price increases, (Brian?), and you think that's where they can see them obviously and... Speaker 1: Know that you're gonna wanna brush up on (gestures?) here on the Kindle Fire. To operate the touch screen to replicate (malfunctions?) you would use on your computer and to remind yourself of those as a quick pop up reminder card, right there and here's the bottom of the 'cause none all of them are into it. And remember on the Kindle Fire, you can pinch and zoom like any other Android device to get to little fiddly stuff on the computer like those little check boxes for closing a window, those can be really hard to hit unless you make them bigger. Oh and a quick way to resize the screen on the Kindle, to scale the display, is just to snap the rotation ones, From portrait back to landscape. Oh and the keyboard that's right over here on the right... whenever you wanna get to it. So that's an easy way to get everything from your computer to work on your Kindle Fire in terms of media that you thought you had to physically move or translate (??) cloud somehow. I'm Brian Cooley. Thanks for watching Just How To.

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