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CTIA 2014 Super Mobility Week: Sony Ericsson Xperia Pureness

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CTIA 2014 Super Mobility Week: Sony Ericsson Xperia Pureness

1:49 /

The Sony Ericsson Xperia Pureness offers basic features and a simple design, but look closer and you'll see a clear display. Kent German puts it through its paces at CTIA 2010.

^B00:00:03 >> Kent German: Hi I'm Kent German Senior Editor here at CNET.com. I'm here at CTIA 2010 with the Sony Ericsson Xperia Pureness. Now the story with this phone is not its features. Most of the Xperia phones we've seen like the Xperia X1, the Xperia X10, they've all been really high end phones with really great features, multimedia. This phone is all about its design. You're probably looking at them you'll say what's special about this design it looks like a normal candy bar phone? In many ways it is. What you notice in the display actually is clear so you can see all the way through it. Now you might be wondering what the point of this is and frankly I mean I'm still wondering that but it is just different, it certainly is unique, not something you don't see often. LG came out with a clear phone last year and that was clear through the keypad, but this is clear just from the display. But if we turn the phone around you can see what you're typing, you can see it backwards. It's not color I'm sure how it would stand up in direct light? When the backlighting is off you don't really see anything, so usability may be another question. Certainly if you want unique this phone is it. It's a pretty standard keypad. There is a navigation toggle, the directional arrows are flat, you do actually press down on them though they're not touch controls. There is a small toggle on the center. There are two soft keys that are also flat, talk and end buttons, and then a menu button and clear button. There's a button on the side for changing the profile. There is the proprietary Sony Ericsson charger port. Sony Ericsson is moving toward a standard Micro USB so you do have to go through the proprietary port here and there's a SIM card slot on this side, that's not behind the battery, there's little space so they do put in a separate door here. NO camera on this phone. It just does have basic features, personal organizers, speaker phone, messaging, it's really all about that clear display. I'm Kent German and this is Sony Ericsson Xperia Pureness.

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