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How To Video: Share huge files on the Net for free
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How To Video: Share huge files on the Net for free

2:27 /

Need to send a massive file to someone? Several services will host the file for you at no charge.

More devices do video these days which means more people shoot video, which means more people want to share the video. But have you attempted to email a huge video file? Anything longer than a couple minutes becomes massive. And most email won't allow large files. On this how to I'll show you a few services that let you share files over the Internet that are larger than 1 GB. Some even do it for free! My favorite is Dropbox. You can store up to 2 gigabytes of data for free, or upgrade to 50 GB or 100 GB for 10 or 20 dollars a month respectively. You're limited to uploading 300 MB at a time if you use the web service, but the software file transfer tool works well, and allows you to take advantage of all the space you have. Once you have your data up there, you can share it with anyone on the Net you want. If 2GB is too small, but your pocketbook is empty, try Glide's gDrive at glidedigital.com. It's not just storage, it's a whole virtual operating system, accessible from almost any browser. You get 30 GB of free storage space. They also cap their Web-based uploads at 200 MB. But if you use the Glide One Sync software you can avoid the cap. Then again, how does no limit sound? Too good to be true? Well sort of. Send This File.com has no limit on the size of your file, though they warn you that some browsers may not allow more than 2 GB through at a time. This service is not meant for long term storage though. Files are deleted after three days, and if you're using the free service, speeds may be throttled at either the upload or download end. Along the lines of temporary storage, WeTransfer.com caps you at 2GB, but is one of the easiest services to use. You pick the file, enter the email address your sending to and from and that's it. Similarly FileDropper.com requires no registration and keeps the files forever at a unique URL. Your capped at 5 9GB unless you pay 1 to 10 dollars a month for more space. Those are your fast free recommendations, but there are dozens of other services. Webware's Josh Lowensohn has a comprehensive writeup of all your options at Webware.com. Now get out there and send some fat files. I'm Tom Merritt, CNET.com.

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