This content is rated TV-MA, and is for viewers 18 years or older. Are you of age?
Sorry, you are not old enough to view this content.
Quick Tips: Quick Tips: Using the rule of thirds
About Video Transcript

Quick Tips: Quick Tips: Using the rule of thirds

1:50 /

You can get more interesting photos by using the "rule of thirds" technique.

[ Music ] ^M00:00:02 >> I'm Brian Cooley with the Quick Tip on taking better pictures with your digital camera using the rule of thirds. This is an old artists technique from way back that allows you to get away from the all too frequent symmetry of centering everything up when you take a picture. That's frankly usually a boring way to do things and it doesn't really tell a story that well. Instead, think of your photo like this. There's your over all view and then divide that in thirds, two lines across, and two lines up and down. Where the lines intercept, these four places are great areas to put the main subject. Let's take a look how it works in practice. Catherine is sitting here in front of a wall of bamboo, and if I took a standard composition, I would center her up in the shot, take the picture like so, and it's fine. It's a serviceable photo, but it's not great. What if I do this? I put her on the left third line and a little bit down to the corner, so it's a little bit on that node in the lower left that I showed you. Now I take the same shot, and it's more interesting to my eye. Now I can tell she is seated along a really interesting long depth of bamboo on this long running cement seated area. It tells a little bit of a story. Another way to use the rule of thirds is when you're taking a picture of the horizon or a landscape or a cityscape. Instead of putting the horizon or the main line right across the middle, consider lining it up with the bottom or even the top third line horizontally. Same thing goes for the verticals if you're taking a picture of anything vertical, whether it's a building, the side of a wall, what have you, use these grid-lines and their intersections as places to put things and you'll get much more interesting photos that lead the viewer through a little visual story. So, do better than the average snapshot. Do your composition using the rule of thirds. ^M00:01:49 [ Music ]

New releases

Rubbin'. Shuntin'. Bumpin': The...
13:23 October 23, 2014
Racing is a family affair in Texas. The XCAR team left their London headquarters to experience first-hand...
Play video
Ask the Editors: iPad Overtime:...
8:58 October 23, 2014
Jeff Bakalar sits down with Scott Stein to discuss his reviews of the iPad Air 2 and iPad Mini 3. Should you...
Play video
Press record for new iPads, Nexuses...
36:18 October 23, 2014
Grab a blank tape for a new podcast featuring the new iPads, Google Nexus 6 and 9, and a Spotify-powered cassette...
Play video
The CraveCast remakes democracy...
34:26 October 22, 2014
In a special holiday CraveCast, we look forward to Halloween and plan ways to stay safe when the world is...
Play video
Tomorrow Daily 073: Robot actors,...
21:31 October 22, 2014
On today's show, we check out a gadget for your shoe that might help you escape a bad date, this year's updates...
Play video
Use your Android as a dSLR rem...
2:10 October 22, 2014
Some Android handsets have the capability to act as an infrared remote for a dSLR. CNET's Lexy Savvides shows...
Play video
Apple Pay sees problems as users...
2:59 October 22, 2014
Bank of America apologizes for a glitch that's causing duplicate Apple Pay charges. Also, Google creates a...
Play video
The LG Tribute is cheap and ch...
1:15 October 22, 2014
Virgin Mobile's LG Tribute is a winning budget Android.
Play video