This content is rated TV-MA, and is for viewers 18 years or older. Are you of age?
Sorry, you are not old enough to view this content.
Quick Tips: Quick Tips: Using the rule of thirds
About Video Transcript

Quick Tips: Quick Tips: Using the rule of thirds

1:50 /

You can get more interesting photos by using the "rule of thirds" technique.

[ Music ] ^M00:00:02 >> I'm Brian Cooley with the Quick Tip on taking better pictures with your digital camera using the rule of thirds. This is an old artists technique from way back that allows you to get away from the all too frequent symmetry of centering everything up when you take a picture. That's frankly usually a boring way to do things and it doesn't really tell a story that well. Instead, think of your photo like this. There's your over all view and then divide that in thirds, two lines across, and two lines up and down. Where the lines intercept, these four places are great areas to put the main subject. Let's take a look how it works in practice. Catherine is sitting here in front of a wall of bamboo, and if I took a standard composition, I would center her up in the shot, take the picture like so, and it's fine. It's a serviceable photo, but it's not great. What if I do this? I put her on the left third line and a little bit down to the corner, so it's a little bit on that node in the lower left that I showed you. Now I take the same shot, and it's more interesting to my eye. Now I can tell she is seated along a really interesting long depth of bamboo on this long running cement seated area. It tells a little bit of a story. Another way to use the rule of thirds is when you're taking a picture of the horizon or a landscape or a cityscape. Instead of putting the horizon or the main line right across the middle, consider lining it up with the bottom or even the top third line horizontally. Same thing goes for the verticals if you're taking a picture of anything vertical, whether it's a building, the side of a wall, what have you, use these grid-lines and their intersections as places to put things and you'll get much more interesting photos that lead the viewer through a little visual story. So, do better than the average snapshot. Do your composition using the rule of thirds. ^M00:01:49 [ Music ]

New releases

Bowers & Wilkins C5 Series 2: A...
0:00 October 24, 2014
The C5 Series 2 sounds better than the original and is one top in-ear headphones for less than $200.
Play video
Mr. Coffee gains some smart home...
2:27 October 24, 2014
The $150 Mr. Coffee Optimal Brew Smart brews 10-cups at a time and can be controlled by the Wemo mobile a...
Play video
The Philips 100W Equivalent LED...
1:20 October 24, 2014
We tested this bulb to see if it's a better buy than GE or Cree
Play video
Breaking open iPads, Groupon's...
2:54 October 24, 2014
The iFixit team reveals the secrets inside the new iPads, Groupon mimics Yelp, and Microsoft kills the free...
Play video
Vizio P series: Good and cheap...
2:31 October 24, 2014
The highly anticipated Vizio P series is among the cheapest 4K TVs available and delivers a very good picture,...
Play video
The 404 Show 1,570: Superhero movie...
27:34 October 24, 2014
We're finishing up the week with the question: is Hollywood's superhero factory comic book overkill? Plus...
Play video
Lenovo's Y50 is even better with...
2:06 October 24, 2014
The 15-inch Y50 Touch gaming laptop swaps its bland original screen for a sharp-looking 4K version.
Play video
Going edge-free with Sharp's Aquos...
2:01 October 24, 2014
Available for Boost Mobile, the Aquos Crystal has a quad-core processor, an 8-megapixel camera, and a 5-inch...
Play video