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The Buzz Report: Putting the "face" in Facebook

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The Buzz Report: Putting the "face" in Facebook

4:59 /

Facebook creeps out the world (again) with facial recognition tagging, Nintendo wins E3, and Apple gets into the cloud ... kind of.

Hi, I�m Molly Wood and welcome to the Buzz Report � the show about the tech news that everyone is talking about. This week, the speed-read version of all the WWDC news, who won E3 this year, and embarrassing Facebook photo tagging in one easy step! But first, it�s the Gadget of the Week. The Gadget of the Week is the Nintendo Wii U. Which, maybe it�s just me, made me think of sirens. It�s Nintendo�s next-generation console, and even though we don�t know a lot about the actual console, the controller is where it�s really at. It�s a 6.2 inch tablet like dealie that has a touch screen AND joystick and button controls, a front-facing camera, a mic, and motion control just like the original Wii-motes. It can act like a secondary display, an actual controller, a Web browser, a mini version of the game you�re playing � it looks, basically, pretty freaking awesome. Except that minus ANY other details or a real time frame for release other than, generally speaking, 2012 � it kind of smells like vaporware up in here. We�ll see. Stinky. And now for the news. Let�s get it over with: Apple held its WWDC keynote, which we covered to DEATH here at CNET TV. If you missed any single second of the two-hour announcement of new OS X features, new iOS 5 features, and the iCloud push and sync service, please visit CNET News or CNET TV for all the details. In a nutshell, on our end: iOS 5 will be just about exactly as awesome as Android when it finally gets around to arriving this fall, OS X Lion will look a lot more like iOS, but for just 30 bucks as an App Store download, and Apple�s iCloud will be just about exactly as awesome as Google Docs but slightly less awesome than Spotify or Lala and way less awesome than, say, Flickr. Good? Good. Moving on, there was more than just Nintendo at E3 in L.A. this week � well, I mean. Kind of. Sony announced the Vita, which is not tasty water, but is a successor to the PSP, and was kind of pedestrian but great if you like the PSP. Also, Sony apologized for its big data breach � kind of. They really just apologized for your inability to play its amazing game console, but not for letting your credit card data get into the wild or storing your passwords in clear text on Websites around the world. Kind of like, �other than that, Mrs. Lincoln how was the play?� And Microsoft announced some new cool-looking Kinect games, Bing search using your voice and Kinect, and some kind of live TV thing involving some partners they didn�t name at a date yet to be determined. There�s that vaporware smell again. Basically, Nintendo won E3. Again. Speaking of Nintendo, it�s time for this week�s Hacker News Blue Plate Special. Those go-getter LulzSec boys apparently broke into Nintendo�s servers, but didn�t steal any data. Ok, really, LulzSec? First PBS and now Nintendo? Yeah, you�re really fighting the good fight, there. Whaddya gonna do next, pull a kitten�s tail? Catch a dolphin in a fishing net? Push a nun down a stairwell? Club a baby seal? Nice. Real nice. And finally, Facebook this week silently rolled out facial recognition tagging to all its users. Yes. By default. The feature scans photos you upload and then suggests tags based on who it thinks are in the pictures. Like, an easier way to tag pictures. Except it�s also an easier way to be identified in potentially embarrassing photos, and it�s not totally clear what happens with public photos -- like what if you�re in Egypt or Libya or Syria, maybe you go to a protest, you get photographed, you get identified, and suddenly you get arrested. And not only did Facebook opt us all in, OF COURSE, , they didn�t even ANNOUNCE they were rolling it out or exactly how it works. At this point, I can�t tell if Facebook will never learn, if Facebook refuses to learn, or if Facebook is trying to learn us not to use Facebook. Anyway. As always, there�s a simple 39-step process in your Privacy settings to turn it all off or control who sees your photos. Anybody else interested in a Friendster reunion tour? And that�s the Buzz Report for this week, everyone. I�m Molly Wood, and thank you for watching.

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