6
This content is rated TV-MA, and is for viewers 18 years or older. Are you of age?
Sorry, you are not old enough to view this content.

First Look: Nikon D5300 hands-on

About Video Transcript

First Look: Nikon D5300 hands-on

3:11 /

With the D5300, Nikon remains at the head of the class of sub-$1,000 dSLRs.

Hi. I'm Lori Grunin, senior editor for CNET, and this is the Nikon D5300. The replacement for its popular D5200, the Nikon D5300 delivers a slightly redesigned and noticeably smaller and lighter body. The incorporation of a sensor without an optical low-pas filter, bigger and better view finder and LCD, and an expanded feature set which now includes Wi-Fi and geo-tagging built right into the camera. Combined with the new 18-140 millimeter lens kit, you get a more expensive, but still a great option for the family photographer or enthusiast. The design and interface are fundamentally the same as the D5200. While it's smaller and lighter, it still feels comfortable to use and reasonably well-built. The grip's redesigned to increase clearance between your hand and lens. It really does feel more comfortable. The drive mode button had to be relocated to the side in order to make room for the Wi-Fi and GPS antennas. And I actually prefer it there. The LCD and view finder are both bigger and a bit nicer. It also has a stereo microphone now. And my only real complaint is about the multi-controller. It feels a little too flat and hard to maneuver precisely. The camera incorporates a new version of Nikon's X-speed image processor, which allows for the addition of 1080/60p video and better battery life-- although the camera does have a new battery. The GPS intermittently fail to tag images though, even when I hadn't moved. Connecting to mobile devices via Wi-Fi works relatively seamlessly, though the camera doesn't have NFC to smooth the kinks of connecting. And Nikon's app has limited tethered shooting capabilities. You can't change any settings, but you can touch focus. I don't like that the app stays loaded in memory on Android when you disconnect. Its performance remains roughly the same as the D5200, which is pretty good for this class. Live View shooting is still on the slow disappointing side. But by all other measures, including its 5.1 frame per second JPEG burst, I think most people will be pretty happy with it. If you shoot RAW, it's still insufficient for continuous shootings since it still only has a six-frame burst buffer. The anti-aliasing filter-free sensor produces great photos. And the extra sharpness it provides, plus the excellent JPEG processing results and usable images as high as ISO 6400. In a body less than $1,000, that's really, really good. Even shooting in 14-bit RAW doesn't seem to preserve a lot of highlight detail, but the camera tends to underexpose as a rule and you can recover a lot of shadow detail without introducing a lot of noise. I'm not crazy about the camera's default settings. They include normal image quality, rather than fine-- which is a higher compression level-- manual adjustments during movie shooting are turned off. And what's a real pain for me, sequential file numbering defaults to off. With the D5300, Nikon remains at the head of the class of sub-$1,000 DSLRs. I'm Lori Grunin, and this is the Nikon D5300.

New releases

2015 Acura TLX V-6 Advance (CNET On Cars, Episode 54)
16:28 November 21, 2014
Acura hopes the TLX is what it will drive into the future, we explore the head-up display coming to your car soon, and check out the...
Play video
Los Angeles Auto Show 2014: CNET's editors choose their favorites
5:55 November 21, 2014
The press days are over here at the 2014 Los Angeles Auto Show. Before we head off into the Hollywood hills we took a moment to re-cap...
Play video
Watch Tony Hawk do endless 360s on a hoverboard, Ep. 184
5:36 November 21, 2014
This week on Crave, we can see sound waves. We might get to see an unexplored part of the moon. But most of all we get to see Tony...
Play video
The $199 HP Stream 11 wants to be as cloud-friendly as a Chromebook, but with Windows 8
2:18 November 21, 2014
If you keep expectations in check, this bargain-basement Windows 8 laptop has good battery life and a decent design.
Play video
Yamaha SRT-1000 gives good single-speaker surround
1:44 November 21, 2014
The Yamaha SRT-1000 sound base offers discrete looks, an astoundingly wide soundstage and plenty of features in a package that is still...
Play video
Hate ads? Pay Google to block them for you
2:50 November 21, 2014
Google is testing an ad-blocker service, Amazon may be inserting ads into streaming video, and Comcast lets you track the cable gu...
Play video
The 404 Show 1,584: Google Contributor, JFK has a drone problem, San Francisco's poo map (podcast)
30:08 November 21, 2014
We're back in the studio today! Join us for a very special episode complete with a full tour and the start of our Call of Duty: Advanced...
Play video
TV buying guide: Tips you need to know
4:12 November 21, 2014
Brian Cooley tells you about the various TV technologies on the market and offers advice on how to shop for a new TV.
Play video