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CNET News Video: Mobile devices erode traditional gaming space

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CNET News Video: Mobile devices erode traditional gaming space

1:37 /

Console-makers Nintendo, Microsoft, and Sony have always competed with each other. Now it seems Google and Apple are rapidly leaping into the gaming world as well, which could change the game entirely. CNET News' Kara Tsuboi reports from the E3 gaming show in Los Angeles.

-Traditionally console makers Nintendo, Microsoft, and Sony have competed with each other, but that may be about to change. -This year, there is much under threat from Apple and from Google as they have many thing else. -John Davison, the vice president of gamespot.com say you can see those 2 influences on many of the new gaming products announced at this year's electronic entertainment expo E3. The most aggressive probably is Nintendo with the Wii U. The fact that they have the 6-inch touchscreen, it's like a tablet built in to the controller, is the biggest step towards, you know, we we've seen acknowledging that the threat coming from android and IOS. -According to the entertainment software association, 72% of American households play video games, but slowly eroding that percentage, mobile phones and tablets. -It's in your pocket all the time. It's always charged. It's always gonna have games on it and you have immediate access to a store where you can download more stuff. -And then there is price. Smartphone or tablet games are often free or 99 cents compare that to traditional console games that can run up to $60. -Everyone wants a piece of our time and they want money on top of that. So, browse the game, mobile games, tablet games, connected TV experiences. All these are competing for entertainment time and dollars and that's what the games industries up against now. -Gaming experts say that if the traditional companies don't innovate and provide accessibility and ubiquity, they could lose out. In San Francisco, I'm Kara Tsuboi CNET.com for CBS news.

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