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How To Video: Make video playlists for iTunes, iPods, and iPhones
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How To Video: Make video playlists for iTunes, iPods, and iPhones

2:23 /

Learn how to make video playlists in iTunes and use them on an Apple iPod or iPhone.

[ MUSIC ] ^M00:00:09 >> [Donald Bell:] Making a playlist of videos in iTunes is about as simple as making a music playlist. You just hit the plus button in the bottom left corner to create a blank playlist, and then drag and drop whatever videos you want onto the list. You can even create playlists that mix music and video files. iTunes will put up a little protest at first, but it can be done. If you've got a monster of a video library or you're just feeling adventurous, you can also use smart playlists to create more advanced selections. To make these, head to the file menu and select "new smart playlist." A good example for this is a smart playlist that collects all of your unwatched TV shows. To get them all in one place, make a smart playlist where the video kind is set to TV show and the play count is zero. Alright, so you've figured out playlists in iTunes. Now let's see how to get them onto your iPod. Connect your iPod to your computer, and you should see the device summary in iTunes. If the "manually manage music and videos" box is checked, then just drag and drop your playlist onto the iPod. Otherwise, click the music tab and make sure the playlist is checked as well as the "include music videos" box. If you're using a video-compatible iPod with the Nano or Classic, you'll find your video playlists in the video menu under video playlists. If your playlist includes both music and video, you'll find a music-only version of your playlist under the music menu and a video-only version under videos. It's a different story on the iPhone or the iPod Touch. You can sync playlists to them, but the content doesn't actually get grouped together. You can fix this by making a video playlist with at least one music track included, in which case the iPhone will think of it as a music playlist and respect it. Another trick is to designate your movies and TV shows as music videos in iTunes. For whatever reason, Apple is fine with you play-listing music videos, but not movies and TV shows. So you have to do a little trickery to make this work. In iTunes, make your video playlist using one of the methods I described earlier. Then select all the files in the playlist, go to the file menu and select "get info." Under the options tab, change the media kind to "music video" and hit "OK." Voila, you're now a master of video playlists for iTunes, the iPod and the iPhone. For CNET.com, I'm Donald Bell. ^M00:02:18 [ MUSIC ]

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