Prizefight: Kindle Touch vs. Nook Simple Touch with Glowlight
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Prizefight: Kindle Touch vs. Nook Simple Touch with Glowlight

5:55 /

The e-reader battle is far from over with Barnes and Noble's Nook Simple Touch looking to take down the established Amazon Kindle Touch. Who will reign supreme?

What's up Prizefight fans? I'm Brian Tong and the e-reader market continues to be a hot link contestant battleground. So, hold on to your butts. It's a Prizefight punch out between the Amazon Kindle Touch Ad Free version and Barnes and Nobles Nook Simple Touch with Glow Light. Now our judges for this fight are executive editor John Go Home (Salton?), executive editor David The Bad Boy (Cornoy?) and myself Brian King Kong Tong. We'll take all 3 judges score and average them out to the nearest 10th each round. The final Prizefight score will be an average of all rounds within the same decimal system. We're doing 5 rounds each. First up is design. Amazon Kindle Touch streamline design with an all touch interface removing the keyboard and using a physical home button. It has a minimalist design with a soft textured backing and it's barely slimmer compared to a competition. Now the Barnes & Noble Nook Simple Touch has a unique E-reader design with rounded corners and a back side contour design. It's more ergonomic and comfortable to hold and the Glow Light version has a gray accent on the border. We wish it was a little thinner but it's smaller footprint is nifty and gives it a edge. The Nook Simple Touch gets a 4.3 and the Kindle Touch gets a 4. Next round is navigation and (??). The Kindle's navigation is simple and straightforward but there are a few curious things. You have to use the power button to wake it from sleeping instead of just pressing the home button that's right there, the home button serves literally no other function than a go back to the home screen and when you're reading, you have to press in a specific area up top to bring up options even though it's a minor annoyance but really the OS is just too plane Jane and lacks any elegance or polish. Now the Nook Simple Touch has both touch and physical control navigation. When reading books you can move to the pages by either touching or using the physical controls on the side to turn pages. Pressing on the screen brings up more options and the home button not only helps to wake the Simple Touch but it's really the heart of the navigation for the main functions and the tool bar plus holding it down activates the Glowlight for reading. Overall the feel and controls here are just better. So, this Simple Touch gets a 4 and the Kindle Touch gets a 3. So, after averaging 2 rounds Barnes and Noble wins. Next round is features. The Kindle Touch can listen to the music or audio book through it's speakers or headphone jack and it really makes it more than just an e-reader, text free to support it but not all books can take advantage of it. With a phone never come to an end. Amazon also has their x-ray mode that breaks down important people, places or topics within the reading but again, it's not available for all books. They continued to leave in a web browser that's still not even worth using even if it's pinch and zoom. It's more like pinch and doom. Another killer features, Amazon's lending library and if you're an Amazon prime member, you'll have access to 145,000 books that you can borrow including the recent edition of the entire Harry Potter series and that's huge. So, how does Barnes & Nobel counter that? Well, the Nook Simple Touch brings the most innovative feature we've seen on an e-reader since the invention of e-reading technology with its Glowlight. It eliminates the entire screen and allows you to read in the dark without disturbing the person next to you. It's truly a one of a kind groundbreaking feature that's trumps any single feature we've talked about and the Kindle team dropped the ball on this one. The Nook Simple Touch brings an SD card expansion slot for filling more content. You can go into a physical retail store and read a selection of books for free, a native (??) support is a big deal for hardcore users. Both e-readers support (overdrive?) for borrowing books from your local libraries. There is PDF reading support plus social hosts for Facebook and Twitter. This one's a close one but the Nook Simple Touch gets the edge with a 4.30 for its revolutionary Glowlight and the Kindle Touch gets a 4. Next round is digital ecosystem. The content that's being offered has become more and more significant and this is where Amazon shines. Amazon has a larger offering of titles and often offers slight better prices. Their lending library is a huge differentiator if you pay for Amazon Prime. Both e-readers offers books, magazines and newspapers. You can lend some books to friends but Amazon's Kindle Touch also let's you download audible audio books, subscribe to blogs and even download games. Barnes & Noble can't match the Amazonian beast when it comes to content and the Kindle takes this round with a 4.7 and the Nook Simple Touch gets a 3. So, for averaging 4 rounds, we're tied at 3.9, the final round that decides it all is value. The Kindle Touch Ad Free Version is 139 bucks and if you're okay with having an ad supported version, it will cost only $99. Now first, I didn't mind if something gets in the way of reading but when I was hammered with Twilight ads for about a month, I had a change of heart. The Nook Simple Touch with Glowlight is also $139 but it sets the standard for e-readers moving forth and is well worth it if you do any night time reading and you won't ever see a 3rd party ad on either of these. The Nook Simple Touch gets a 4 and the Kindle Touch gets a 3. So, let's average out all 5 rounds and in the battle with the Nook came out firing, Amazon hits back hard for digital ecosystem but it just wasn't enough and the Nook Simple Touch with Glowlight takes this battle 3.9 to 3.8 and it's your Prizefight winner. I'm Brian Tong. Thanks for watching and we'll catch you guys next time on another Prizefight.

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