First Look: Jays c-Jays
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First Look: Jays c-Jays

2:00 /

Jays delivers a smooth-sounding on-ear headphone that gives you three ear cushions to customize your listening experience. Although they don't come cheap, the c-Jays are a worthwhile investment if you're shopping for an aftermarket pair of on-ear headphones to fit your mobile lifestyle.

Hey, Justin Yu here, headphones editor for CNET.com. Today, I'm taking a look at the Jays c-Jays Headphones. So, at first glance, you might be getting flashbacks of those cheap black plastic headphones that came with the old Sony Walkmans, if you're old enough to remember that reference. But, if you take a closer look, you'll see that Jays put a lot of thought into its design. Each of the 1-3/4-inch speakers are made with reinforced fiber and nylon with a joint at the bottom of the sides adjuster that lets you fold the two cups for easy storage and transport. The headphones are also incredibly lightweight. They weigh just under 2.6 ounces so you can barely tell when they're on your head. Jays also gives you three different sizes of earcup foam covers that let you change the comfort and sound of the c-Jays. You get the small ones, the medium size that I'm wearing here, and the large option that also vary in density, so they get thicker as you go up in size. The smallest pads are also the thinnest which allow the most sound to run through. These will be your main choice if bass is a big factor to you that they don't provide as much padding as we're accustomed to so comfort might be an issue there. The largest pads are extremely comfortable, like an old La-Z-Boy couch and they changed the headphones into circumaural cans that cover your whole ears, but the oversize padding blocks almost all audible instrument separation and detail from entering your ears, so sound might be an issue there. And in a scene straight out of the Goldilocks story, we think the medium pads are the best compromise between comfort and sound clarity. They allowed an adequate amount of bass and treble to come through and the sound stage is close to precise without leveling off the way the larger pads do. The benefit of the c-Jays is that you get all three pads to test and choose from and it's really easy to swap them out depending on your taste. You can read all about the c-Jays sound quality, build design, and all the accessories you get in our full review on CNET.com, but that's gonna do it for me. I'm Justin Yu and these are the Jays c-Jays Headphones. That sounds good to me.

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