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CNET News Video: Instagram backpedals on new privacy rules

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CNET News Video: Instagram backpedals on new privacy rules

1:27 /

Instagram has issued an apology to users concerned that their pictures would be sold for marketing purposes. CNET's Sumi Das has more on how the service's terms of use are changing and how you can protect your photos.

-With its artsy filters and free photo sharing features, Instagram has attracted over 30 million users who upload 5 million pictures daily, but its recent policy changes have left many angry and confused. Initially, it appear Instagram was claiming the right to sell user's photos. In a blog post Tuesday, founder Kevin Systrom wrote that Instagram does not intend to sell photos and would "like to experiment with advertising that feels appropriate." -Instagram really has this problem that it's a free product. People just use it from their android or iPhones, smartphones, and there's no ads. There's no sign-up free. There's no limit on how many pictures you would take. So, it really becomes an instance of how do they make money in the long term. This is really one of those things that they can do. -Despite the backpedal and the assurances of privacy, some users still wanna jump ship. If you choose to delete your Instagram account, that doesn't mean you lose your precious photos. -There's third-party services that will pull all your photos and the original copies. Also, when you use the app, it saves a local copy to your camera roll. So, for people who have been using it on their smartphones or other devices, they should already have a backup. Instagram rivals Flicker and Blipfoto are also more than eager to snap up any Instagram defectors. In San Francisco, I'm Sumi Das, cnet.com for CBC News.

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