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The Fix: How to choose a dSLR lens

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The Fix: How to choose a dSLR lens

2:44 /

Ready to upgrade your dSLR photos? Find out which lens will suit your needs.

[MUSIC] If you're a DSLR owner the lens the came with your camera is great for getting started. But eventually you will grow out of it. So, if you're ready to purchase a new lens, I have a few recommendations on exactly how to go about it. Hands down, my favorite lens is the 50 millimeter 1.86 lens. It's great for portraits, food photos, and still-lifes. It is a prime lens, or six lends, so it doesn't zoom, which means you'll have to get really close to your subject in order to frame up, but the trade-off is huge. It's a SAS lens with a wide aperture, which means. Super sharp photos, even in low light. The best part, is that it's only $100, and that's about as cheap as it gets. When you're shopping for a portrait lens, what you want is a lens that won't distort your subject. You want the person to look like they do to the human eye. You also want that really cool blurry background effect. On a full size sensor camera like the Canon 5D, get a lens with a focal length from 80 millimeters to 100 millimeters. On a cross centre camera like this one that translates to about 50 millimeters. If you want to go any shorter than 50 millimeters, your subject will start to look a little too stretched out, so stick with this range. [MUSIC] For food photography, you don't necessarily need a zoom lens. Instead, go with a prime lens like the 35 millimeter 1.4. [MUSIC] At this focal length, the shots will be just wide enough to get a crisp photo of an entire plate of food without distorting it. Since it's fixed, you will have to move around to get closer or wider, but really that's a part of the intimacy of food photography. When you're traveling, there's a good chance you'll want a lens that will take great landscape photos. Letting you capture wide sweeping shots of whatever exotic place you're in. [MUSIC]. If you have to choose one lens to take with you on a trip, the 18 to 35 millimeter 1.8 is the way to go. At its widest you'll get great sweeping views of landscape, and it's still great for close-ups of food and portraits of people. All around this is a great go to lens. [MUSIC]

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