CNET News Video: Google Chrome OS demonstration
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CNET News Video: Google Chrome OS demonstration

9:26 /

Vice President of Product Marketing Sundar Pichai gives a virtual tour of Google's new operating system, Chrome OS.

[ Music ] ^M00:00:03 >> It's [inaudible]. It looks like Chrome, but on the top left-hand side, you're seeing some small tabs. We call these application tabs. So you can take any of your favorite applications -- in my case, it's Gmail and calendar, etcetera. But it could be Facebook. It could be Yahoo Mail. Whatever users want. You can take any application, and with one click, pin it to be a favorite application. And once you do that, we call these application tabs. We are working very hard to make it possible for you to get to your favorite applications instantly. So once you choose something as an application tab, they always stay in place. So let's open a few tabs. As you can see, Ken is opening a few tabs, but the application tabs on the top left, the five of them, don't move at all. So you can open, close, etcetera. They always stay in place. So we are working very hard to make it easy for you to access your favorite applications. In addition to this method of accessing your applications, there is, on the top left-hand side, you have something what we call as the "app menu." So [inaudible] here is going to change, but the concept is we really want you to be able to discover new applications, as well as access your top applications. So let's go around and start poking around the app menu. I am noticing an interesting app called "contacts." So let's try it out. Something interesting happened. Something popped from below. Internally, we call these as moles because they kind of come from underground, but we're gonna call them panels, externally. So panels are something, which these are persistent, lightweight windows, which you can have them around with you all the time. They're persistent. So, for example, let's click on a few tabs. They don't move at all, right? And the panel stays. It's a persistent window. There are several interesting use cases for it. You can minimize them, and make them go away, and you can bring them back. We're gonna work hard to make sure we can automatically manage panels for users. So there's a chat window. So Ken is chatting with David, one of the engineers on the team. And hopefully, David says hi back. There you go. So buddy lists and chat is a great example how you would use a panel. Let's see what other use cases for panels are there. So let's poke around. There's notepad, so let's click on notepad as an example, so one more panel. The interesting thing about Chrome OS is I mentioned all data is in the cloud. So what does that mean? So Ken is going to type something here, and maybe we should go to Google Doc, and open this notepad file. You can see it's right there, in the cloud. All data in Chrome OS is in the cloud. So as a model, anything you put on the machine is instantly available to you from anywhere, so -- which is something we are very, very excited about. Let me show one more use case for panels. Let's type YouTube in the Chrome Omni box. Recently, we launched this very cool music feature called "Music One Box," by which you can type in names of songs, and play it right off the Google search page. So let's click on "Beautiful Day." You can see a panel popped up, and it plays right in place. It's a persistent window. You can leave it there. You can minimize it and keep working, right? You can use this to pull streamed music from the web. So these are interesting examples of how we expect people to use panels. Before we get caught up in the song, so let's wrap it up. If you go to the -- well, let's go poke around in the app menu once more. So what I like about netbooks is today's travel, when I go on vacations, it's tough to carry my DVD player, my computer, my book reader, etcetera. The great thing about netbooks is these are ultra light, ten mobile devices. And once battery times get much better, you can carry them around with you as general-purpose devices. So we actually expect these to be great entertainment devices. People should be able to watch videos, play music, play games, books, etcetera. So let's see how the experience looks like. So, I'm an avid chess player, so I have this chess game, which I use on my Chrome OS machine. And you can now, with just a flash -- So we're okay? Okay, so it's great. So Ken is playing the chess game. You can see how it's very easy and visual, and you can make it full-screen more and take over the screen. So these are good examples of what we expect people to do with these machines. In fact, another good example of what you can do is read books. So, for example, we're working hard on this experience, and we have ways to go. But if you look at Google Books, for example, here is "Alice in Wonderland." So you can have it on your netbook in a full screen mode, and you can read conveniently. It's -- you know, these are scanned books, which are available. And I can totally imagine reading it to my daughter, carrying a netbook around with me. So it's very, very compelling. So we are really interested in solving all these interesting user experiences for people. One of the things is I've spent all my time in one Chrome window, but it's very common for users to have multiple sets of windows. So we want to walk you through that experience. For example, it's the time of the year in which I'm trying to get all my gift shopping done before holidays come around, right? So I have a set of windows with Amazon, eBay, etcetera. So I can easily switch over to the other windows. And so I have Amazon and eBay, it's a completely different Chrome instance for me. And I even have YouTube. I want to take the chance to show that YouTube works and Flash works on the machine. So let's click on a video and make sure it works. So as you can see, YouTube works and Flash works. I just moved to another window. Let's go back to the original window. You can move back and forth. In fact, you can go to the O-View mode, and you can see all the windows, which are open on your system. The [inaudible] I hear is gonna change a little bit, but you can imagine, I can open a new Chrome window, right, it and I can drag and drop the tab from one Chrome window to another Chrome window. It's very simple, very intuitive, and just works. So this is the core part of the user experience. Having said that, one of the things we realize is people are gonna buy these netbooks. They're gonna go home and do a lot of common things they're used to doing with computers. So we actually have a long list of all these use cases, and we are working hard to make sure it works seamlessly for users. Let me walk through a couple examples. Most people plug in their cameras, right? They may plug in a USB drive, and so what happens if you plug in a USB drive? You can imagine -- this is a rough concept -- but you can imagine Chrome opens a tab and shows you what's in the content of the camera or a USB drive. And you can see the files that are on the machine. It turns out, in this USB drive, there are Excel files. We don't have Microsoft Excel on this machine, so what happens if you click Excel file? Let's give it a shot. It turns out Microsoft Office launched a killer app for Chrome OS. They have been working very, very hard to do this. The point here is Chrome OS does not have a proprietary app framework. It's a completely open app framework. It's the web, so anybody who puts up by URL, anybody who writes an application that works on the web and in a browser is writing an application for Chrome OS. It's something we are very, very excited by it. And for the record, I'm an avid Google spreadsheets user, just a disclaimer. So there are a few other use cases people can do. Here's an interesting use case we can demonstrate. So Ken is going to take a picture. In fact, he has one of the new Droids, and it has a five-megapixel camera, so it's pretty cool. So hopefully, we are gonna get a good picture out of it. And he's gonna take a picture, and let's see what happens if you plug this in your Chrome OS machine. So you can see, Chrome OS did accept the camera as a storage device -- the phone as a storage device. It can pull the picture right there. So he's clicking on the picture, and here you go. I can see [inaudible] squarely in the center of the picture. So it turns out there is a video on the phone as well, so let's try and see what happens if you click the video. The video plays right in place in the panel we talked about. So the point here is we really want it to be possible for all these seamless use cases to -- I mean, for all these use cases for uses to be seamless. We just want computers to be delightful and work, so we're working very hard to make that possible. One final example like this I want to give it is people run into many, many different types of files, right, when they use a computer. They need to be able to use those files. For example, let's go to one of my favorite websites. I go there pretty often. It's called IRS.gov, and let's poke around and click on a PDF file, right? So what happens if you click on a PDF file? It works. It's instant. It's in the browser, right? So that's [inaudible] of what we are trying to accomplish, speed, simplicity, and security. ^E00:09:25

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