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CNET News Video: Getting all your photos into one secure place
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CNET News Video: Getting all your photos into one secure place

1:50 /

If spring cleaning means dealing with photos in boxes and on DVDs, PCs, and phones, consider putting them all in one safe place. CNET's Kara Tsuboi and Sarah Mitroff discuss cloud storage options for storing, organizing, sharing, and protecting your snaps.

It's easy for pictures and boxes of pictures to pile up. And that doesn't even include the photos stored on your computer, your phone and DVDs. Using an online cloud service is a way to safeguard your precious memories from loss, theft and damage. You can access it from any computer that has. An Internet connection. Any device that has Internet connection. Most services will automatically upload photos from your phone, but for older, physical prints, you need to digitize and upload them. It just requires a lot of up-front work. Cloud services like Copy, by Barracuda Networks, Box. Flicker, OneDrive, Dropbox and Google Drive of free limited storage. They differed how they let you edit, organize, view and share your photos. You can go to Google Plus and crop and auto enhance and all of those things. Dropbox recently introduced it's Carousel feature for photos. Having the ability to easily view and privately share pictures that span your life. What's amazing is I have my whole life in there. So my photos from. This morning going all the way back to the photos from when I was a baby. You start by getting all photos from your phone, and then you can get photos from everywhere in there just by dragging and dropping them into your Dropbox folder. And then they all show up beautifully organized in this timeline, it's like having your whole life in your pocket. And then we also make it really easy to privately to share these photos. Such an **** today. Microsoft OneDrive is another option. You install OneDrive. You check a box. And every photo you take is automatically put up in the cloud. So if you lose your phone, you don't lose your photos. Regardless of the service, it's always smart to backup your backups. If somethings really important. Buy your own hard drive and back it up manually. Use multiple cloud services if you want to. For more on cloud services, visit Cnet.com. In San Francisco, I'm Kara Tsuboi, cnet.com for CBS News. [MUSIC]

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