How To Video: Force your browser to always start in private mode
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How To Video: Force your browser to always start in private mode

2:09 /

Google calls it "Incognito," Microsoft says "InPrivate," the other browsers call it "Private Mode," and colloquially it's known as "porn mode." Whatever you call the tracks-free way to browse, here's a trick to force your favorite browser to always start with its privacy protocols activated

^M00:00:00 [ Music ] ^M00:00:10 >>All the major browsers now have a private mode which prevents them from recording where you go to the browsers history and cache. I don't really care whether you call it by Google's nom de guerre, incognito, or by the more colloquial porn mode but there's good reasons for wanting your browser to never leave a trace. I am Seth Rosenblatt for CNET Download.com and in this how to video I'll show you how to set your web browser to always open in private mode on Windows. The trick is to add a command line switch to the browser's executable shortcut. First off, locate the browser's shortcut. If you want to keep the option of launching directly into private mode or regular mode, you can create a second shortcut. Right click on it and go to the shortcut tab, then add a space after the .exe. In Firefox and Internet Explorer you're going to want to type "-private." In Firefox, it's a good idea to check the bottom of the tools menu to see if stop private browsing is listed since there's no other indication that Firefox is running in private browsing mode. You should be able to instantly Telify ease in private mode is running from the tool bar icon and landing page. In Chrome, you're going to want to type "--incognito." Look for the man with the hat icon when you run the browser. If you're running the Beta or Dev channels, you now get extension support during incognito sessions. In Opera, you'll need to add "-newprivatetab" since the browser can run private browsing on a per tab basis. Note that it will also open a second tab that's not in private mode. Apple doesn't seem to have enabled a command line option for Safari for Windows even though the browser does have its own private mode. So whether you're addicted to the Stock Market or to South Park, now you know how to always open your browser in private mode. For CNET.com I'm Seth Rosenblatt.

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