How To Video: Find your lost device with Android Device Manager
About Video Comments (0 ) Transcript

How To Video: Find your lost device with Android Device Manager

2:18 /

Can't find your Android phone or tablet? Pinpoint its location and remotely erase it with the Android Device Manager. Sharon Vaknin shows you how.

If you've been jealous of Apple's Find My iPhone service, you've probably wondered why Google doesn't give Android owners the same thing. Well, it took a few years, but that locator tool is finally here. The Android Device Manager lets you find an Android phone or tablet, make it ring, and if you think it's in the hands of a thief, you can even remotely erase it. To show you how this works, let's say I lost this phone and I'm trying to find it with this tablet. First, head on over to google.com/android/devicemanager and log in with the Google account associated with the device you're looking for. Use the drop-down menu in the white box to choose the device you wanna locate. Now, if we look at my lost phone, we can see that the GPS is working to find it. Back in the browser, the blue circle on the map shows you where your device is. It's not a precise location, but it's usually accurate within a few decimeters. At this point, you can make your phone ring by clicking this button and it will sound off even if it's on silent. If you think your phone was stolen, it's probably a good idea to leave the investigation to the police. In the meantime, you can use this Erase Device option to remotely wipe all the data. For this feature to work, you'll have to set it up on that device ahead of time. Head to your phone or tablet, then go to Google Settings, Android Device Manager, and check this box. Just note that if you are forced to use that Erase Device option, you completely lose access to it. Meaning, you can no longer locate it. Now, it's great that Google is finally giving us this feature, but it could use a little help. For starters, you can't remotely lock your phone, so be sure to set a secure lock screen passcode and this probably goes without saying, but this feature only works when the phone you're looking for is online and still registered to your account. If you have any questions along the way, hit me up on Twitter and check out howto.cnet.com for the written guide to this tutorial. For CNET.com, I'm Sharon Vaknin.
  • This is the interactive sidebar!

    Click any icon for more information as they appear--don't worry, we'll pause the video and wait for you to come back.

  • Links Polls Galleries
  • Video Review

New releases

Porsche 959: Posterchild of the...
10:10 July 24, 2014
If you had posters of cars on your bedroom wall when you were a kid chances are the Porsche 959 may have been...
Play video
Sony Xperia M2 is a sleek, affordable...
2:27 July 24, 2014
Check out our video review of the Sony Xperia M2. It's an affordable Android phone with a 4.8-inch display,...
Play video
How the £100 Nokia points the way...
32:07 July 24, 2014
Microsoft has revealed the cheapest Nokia smartphone yet, but how does the 530 point to the future of Windows...
Play video
The Netgear R8000 Nighthawk X6...
4:47 July 23, 2014
CNET editor Dong Ngo finds the Netgear R8000 Nighthawk X6 Wi-Fi router a hefty investment that doesn't return...
Play video
Can Android do for wearables what...
14:49 July 23, 2014
Google makes a play to be the center of the wearable universe, cars that communicate to each other, and what...
Play video
How accurately do fitness trackers...
2:13 July 23, 2014
As the "quantified self" craze continues, fitness trackers have us obsessing over not only how active we are...
Play video
Tomorrow Daily 023: Amazon Fire...
24:16 July 23, 2014
Today, Amazon Fire phone reviews started dropping (and they're not very good), Samsung puts a price tag on...
Play video
Philips' speaker base not for bass...
1:39 July 23, 2014
The Philips Blu-ray Surround Base HTB3525B offers a compelling combination of useful features and appropriate...
Play video
 

Video discussion

Conversation powered by Livefyre