Home Entertainment: Find the perfect spot for your TV
About Video Comments (0 ) Transcript

Home Entertainment: Find the perfect spot for your TV

2:47 /

Even if you can see your big-screen set from across the room, that doesn't mean you should sit that far away. Sharon Vaknin shows you how to place your TV in your home theater's sweet spot.

Before you start building your dream home theater, the first thing you wanna do is find the optimal position for your TV since all the other components will surround it. First, let's talk about distance. This number or formula has changed over the years as we've gone from standard of TVs to High-def widescreens. See, back in the olden days, you wanted to sit to sit pretty far away from your screens that you wouldn't notice how bad the picture was, but now we've got content in 720 and 1080p which means we can get bigger screens and sit a lot closer. Lots of manufacturers recommend that you take the diagonal size of your screen and multiply it by 2-1/2 to get the distance in inches you should sit from your screen. Well, at CNET we say that even with big screens, the closer you sit the better. So take your screen size and multiply it by 1-1/2 and that's the distance in inches you should sit from your TV. So for example, a 40-inch screen times 1.5 gives you 60 inches or 5 feet. Sitting that close will give you a more immersive experience and you'll be able to appreciate all those crisp HD pixels. Then comes height, there are a lot of opinions here but the bottom line is that the TV shouldn't be so high that you're craning your neck or so low that you're looking down at it. A good starting point is to position the center of the TV at about eye level. Most times that means placing your TV on a relatively low stand but if you're hell bent on placing it above something like a fireplace, then go with an articulating mount which will allow you to tilt the TV down toward you. And finally, placement. The biggest takeaway here is that you shouldn't place your TV opposite of any bright light sources. Now not only will it ruin the appearance of whatever you're watching but it will also give you eye strain. Now lights can be turned off but if you have any windows you can't avoid, consider getting blackout curtains. Now you've got a real home theater. So that's your basic setup, but remember none of these tips are hard and fast rules. So go ahead and play around with them and remember that really the best setup is the one that's most comfortable for you. If you have any tips or any questions, hit me up on Twitter and check out howto.cnet.com for more tips like this. For CNET, I'm Sharon Vaknin.

New releases

Give yourself a helping hand with...
6:28 July 25, 2014
When you wish you had an extra pair of hands, two extra robot fingers could be enough. Also, the "holy grail...
Play video
Nokia Treasure Tag tracks your...
1:30 July 25, 2014
If you're constantly misplacing your things -- or are worried you might -- this Bluetooth tracker for iOS,...
Play video
GE's Advantium wall oven combo...
1:34 July 25, 2014
Equipped with a super-charged microwave that browns as well as bakes, the two-drawer Advantium wall oven combo...
Play video
Disable the Fire Phone's 3D fe...
0:55 July 25, 2014
Dynamic Perspective can quickly become more annoying than useful. Here's how to disable it.
Play video
A mini mighty ninja that can't...
2:06 July 25, 2014
The NutriNinja packs plenty of power but falls short of being an all purpose blender.
Play video
Convenience, price, not power is...
2:21 July 25, 2014
For $40 the Hamilton Beach Stay or Go blender offers commuting smoothie drinkers an affordable way to sip...
Play video
Connecting with GE's new freestanding...
2:25 July 25, 2014
With great safety features and an affordable price tag GE looks to bring their new WiFi enabled oven to the...
Play video
Worst tech logos
3:00 July 25, 2014
Some of the most important names in tech started off with awful logos.
Play video
 

Video discussion

Conversation powered by Livefyre