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Facebook's iOS app gets stickers, Chat Heads: CNET Update

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CNET Update: Facebook's iOS app gets stickers, Chat Heads

2:55 /

The social network gives iPhone users a way to use certain Home features, Google sidesteps ads in Glass, and CNET looks at how tech was used to communicate after Boston Marathon explosions.

It's time to start a new type of sticker collection. I'm Bridget Carey and this is your CNET Update. Google released more details and specs about the first limited edition version of Google Glass Eyewear. There are no speakers. You'll hear sounds through bone conduction technology where the sound waves travel through your skull to your inner ear. It has a 5-megapixel camera that can capture video in 720p. The battery said to last today but video recording and doing live video chat hang outs will drain it faster and these early models will have GPS and text messaging but only when paired with the Android Operating System 4.0.3 or higher. Also, users will not see any advertisements while using it at least for now. All the developers working on apps for Glass have been told they can have any ads in their apps. So, it seems Google wants to keep ads out of your eyeball while you warm up to the idea of wearing a computer on your face. Only a select group of developers and those who entered a contest were able to get the opportunity to buy Google Glass. But here's something Android fans can order now. The Galaxy S4. Pre-orders have begun for AT&T and US Cellular and the phones will ship on April 30th. Facebook updated its iOS app to include Chat Heads and a new thing called Stickers. It's not the same as Chat Heads on Android. On Apple, these chat icons can only be seen within the Facebook app and in a message, iOS users can send these oversized animated characters called Stickers, which are currently free to send. Social media always becomes a tool for quickly spreading information about a disaster or emergency and that of course was true for the bombings at the Boston Marathon. What's not worthy from a tech perspective is that law enforcement could be helped in their investigation by all the photos and videos taken by the thousands of spectators at the marathon. With smartphones making it easy to record, it could become a crowd source to record what happened. Boston police talked to Twitter to ask people for video of the finish line and the web became a resource to track down loved ones through databases put up by Google and the Red Cross. And these only resources are important because cell networks are not reliable when there's a massive increase in voice calls during an emergency. In Boston, shortly after the attack, networks were down but text messages worked. And that's important to remember if you ever need to reach someone in a crisis, use text messages. Text data travels on a different pipeline than voice calls. And if it's backed up, text messages will wait in a queue to be sent unlike calls that simply disconnect. That's your tech news update. You can find more details at cnet.com/update. From our studios in New York, I'm Bridget Carey.
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