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The 404: Ep. 1460: Where it's still so early
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The 404: Ep. 1460: Where it's still so early

34:33 /

On today's 404 episode we'll tell you how Microsoft is breeding the next generation of young exterminators; why you'll never see the words "massive," "epic," or "amazeballs" on Gawker sites ever again; and how seasonal affective disorder (SAD) can play a big part in crowdsourced local business reviews.

It's Friday April 4, 2014. I'm REL Nunez and from our CBS studios in New York City, welcome to the 404. [MUSIC] That's right Mr. REL Nunez, today is 404 day, it's our day. Thank you for being here on the program, ladies and gentlemen. I'm Jeff Bakalar. I'm Justin Yu. Thanks for tuning in to the very special day. A lot of crazy news happening. Yeah. 404 Day. Mm-hm. And you know what? What better day to talk about this bit of news, now look it's, it's, it's early. Mm-hm. It's very early in this process. [LAUGH] Now wait. Before you say what you're going to say, I want everyone to know that I have no idea what you're about to say. Oh, oh you don't know? Okay. This is weird. Huge deal. You just going to drop this news on me, live. Huge flipping deal, my friend. This is big news for all of us. The thrice of us. Okay? Okay. As you know, last night, the great late night show host Mr. David Letterman announced he would be retiring from the late show come, 2015. Right. And again its early. Its very early in this process. People are talking and, right now. There is a chance. Don't say it. That the 404 comes in and takes over for Mr. David Letterman in 2015. [LAUGH] Now, again, what I said early, some calls were made. Yeah. You think I'm joking. It is April 4th. Right. It's 404 day. 404 day. Very appropriate for this big news. It's the one day a year where we get good news. I saw Steve Guttenberg's tweet. Steve Guttenberg. He wants someone to step up to the plate and for that person to be us. Well he's long championed us as the next runners-up for the role. Which, I mean I think, even if you're, if you're a logical person, we seem to be the next logical step. Yeah. Like if you're, if you're a logical person, you're like well, you have David Letterman, staple of late night, and then you talk about people who could easily take over like Chelsea Handler or Jon Stewart or People who probably would think are way more capable than you or I. Mm-hm. But that logic gets thrown out the window, for this one. Right. That could be cool. We, we need, we need help from our street team. We need help to get the word out, out. I got, I've had, I've had phone calls. Mm-hm. Of just saying, you think I'm joking around, you son of a ****. With less, with Les Moonves, no less. I mean, who else would I be talking to about this? Okay. These things are, are possibly happening. Wheels are turning. Gears are turning. Steam is coming out of those gears. You joke around. Does steam come out of gears? Yeah. That, what are you, joke around, I'm not joking, do I, I am the dead f'n serious, sir. You would be willing to pick up that mantle, and host that show? How is doing that show any different from this show? That's true. Interviewing celebrities. Ariel could be our sound, music guy. That'd be really cool. I mean, give the kid a couple turntables and we're in. We're there. In the business. Watch out, Fallon. They want to skew lower, a younger demo. A young, dumber demo? Not dumber. Just kidding. You know, come on. We're ready for prime time. Yeah. Have some fricking faith in yourself for once. I think we can do it. I think if we keep on doing this podcast for another 50 or 60 years. It's a hiring within, which is what big corporations like to do. Yeah. They hire within. This is the logical step, Craig Ferguson maybe. You would think. Right. I don't know. I like how you're assuming they wouldn't just put us into the slot after whoever gets this show. No, we're clearly just go right to the 11pm spot. In the stranger. Again, logic what did I say? Out the window. Yeah, I'm glad that you have faith in this show man. You can help this happened #404LateNight. Done. Feed the dream. Feed the dream. Live the dream. Be the dream. Exciting stuff. I think, I mean. Can't wait. I'm not gonna lie. Pressure. Yeah. Just pressure. This is a man deluded. Very, very delusional. Portrait of a young man drowning, I could call it. I feel fine. I've, I've never been more lucid in my entire life. Okay. The planets lined up. The stars lined up. We have a year, to prove ourselves. I think it's, I think that year's about to dictate a fortuitous story of success. Yeah. In the meantime, Yeah. Let's keep doing what we do. I think so. Doing the good work that we do, putting on good shows. We wouldn't stop. We would still do 404 and then the late night show at night, done. Right. That's true. It's easy, yeah. You people, you're the reason we're here. Yeah, we'll command the internet and television. Wow. Chris Hardwick seemed to figured that out. I like that, that's true, that's true. Why can't we? You fool. You are such a dummy. You call me a fool and I'm speaking, literally speaking gospel right now. Short show today, we are going to talk about a few stories. Why don't you do the rundown. I like it when you talk about the stories we are going to discuss. Well it's understandable, cuz, cuz I do a better job, is that what you're saying? . Yeah, definitely. Oh stop it. three, three big time stories today. Talking about Microsoft, are they breeding a generation of young exterminators. If that's what's happening. Five year olds, young five year olds. Gawker is banning internet slang. We'll get more into that. And then a study that shows bad weather makes online reviewers cranky. Mm-hm. Everyone gets their their, their, their panties in a bunch over the bad weather. Yeah. And that translates to online reviews. So those are the three big time stories we got for you today. Justin Yu, air drum it out for us. Tell us what we've got with number one. Let's talk about Microsoft. So, we talk, we've been talking a lot lately just about how smart kids are when it comes to technology. We're actually talking about opposite of that. You would say that they're dumb. Yeah, I think they're very dumb. I think they're very smart. So, it would make sense that I would put the story to the run-down to prove my point. Sure. I, I'm just going to go ahead and disagree with you. Okay. Let me give you the run-down first and you let me know what you think. Sure. So a five year old kid has pretty much secured his career working for video games. After he inadvertently discovered a bug in the XBox console. The XBox One? The XBox One. The X bone itself. The story starts just after last Christmas of 2013 when five year old Kristoffer Von Hassel. His parents began to notice that their XBox live account who the dad was actually using. the, his Xbox live account was being used to play games. Hm. Which is weird because he wasn't playing them and he also had the parental lock set to on. So that was kinda strange. And they weren't sure what was going on since somebody was bypassing that security measure and you know, they found out that it was young Christopher. And this is how he did it. So smart. Remember, this is a five year old that figured this out. He did it by accident? No, he did this on purpose. Christopher found out that when he typed in the wrong password for his dad's account, he got sent a password verification screen, right? Right. Normal. And then after that from there all he had to do, because they show you how many letters are in the password apparently. Really? That's what it said. That was. Did the microphone pick that up? I was going to say I wonder if audio listeners have just heard Justin's stomach grumbled. [LAUGH] That was really weird. Did you hear that? I heard, it sounded like a, like a, like a velociraptor in your belly. Yeah, that was weird. Did you hear that, Ariel. Nah, I didn't hear it. It was like this. It was like [SOUND] growling, feed me. [LAUGH] Are you okay? I am so hungry right now. [LAUGH] Have you eaten today, it's 2:30? I know I haven't. We're, we're broadcasting a little later than normal. I didn't have time for lunch. Nevertheless five-year old Christopher. Yeah, five year old Christopher. All he had to do was type in the space keys. All he did was press the space bar a few times and then hit enter. What? And, it's not a very complicated, bug. But he was allowed to access the Xbox through the backdoor because of that. Okay, but is, is he like a hacker? Like come on! Yeah. [LAUGH] This is not exactly like mission impossible. Right. And then he broadcast it to all the other five year old's in the world this hack. Yeah right, I mean, lets be honest, this isn't exactly, you know, Sneakers. Right. But get this. There's another part of the story. It's not the first time that he's hacked some hardware. I guess when he was one. He got past the lock screen on his dad's phone, just by holding down the home key for an extra long time. And like, I don't know what phone that was. When he was one. He was one years old. When you're one you do not possess the cognitive ability. But it could be intuition. No. No? No. I think what we're finding out is Microsoft makes a bunch of child proof. [LAUGH] Yeah. Stuff that is not child proof. Right, this is Microsoft's bad, definitely. It's totally, I mean come on like for whatever reason like I, this example is going to be really off color, but I'm just going to say it anyway. When I was growing up, there was like cable boxes. Oh yeah. Right? And there was like a weird way that you could like hit a sequence of buttons, Yeah. And you could get certain channels Mm-hm. That young adolescent boys might want to watch. By like, continually hitting a button. Mm-hm. It was like a hackable sequence of inputs. And I feel like, how did that information pan out? Like how did someone figure. And this is pre-internet too. Pre-internet. It was like '93, '92. Right. We're like, yeah there was an internet, but it wasn't, pr, you know, accessible. Yeah, I don't know how did people find out, pamphlets? That's what I'm, right, did like someone like, send them a, like a, like a postcard? Yeah, I dunno, that's weird. Anyway, but that feeds into the same sort of like level of hacking that this is. Right, and I'm sure other five year olds are super pissed at this narc. For giving out what they've probably been doing for years now. Right. And he got pressed by his parents once, and then gave up the goods. Sure. Total narc, but, Total narc. Regardless, he was rewarded for it when they sent it to Microsoft. They sent him a 1 year Xbox Live account, 500 bucks, and then a couple of games. Right. So, he kind of got out pretty well because of this. Yeah. I mean, you know, it's, it's just mind blowing that this hadn't happened before. Yeah. And through all the quality assurance testing and all the quality control, that Microsoft never accidentally stumbled upon this little this little back door thing. Mm-hm. But you see, this is the kind of stuff that actually makes me afraid. For having a kid and then giving him technology. Like a phone for example. That's why you just give him like ball in a cup. Yeah. How do you, I mean. You cant, cant like steal, you know, passwords with a ball in a cup. It's like piracy. There's always, those pirates are always gonna be one step ahead, ahead. Your kids are always gonna be step ahead of you and whatever security you think is locking your stuff. I don't know about that. I don't know about that. You don't think so? No. You think you'd be able to thwart your kid? Until he or she is like 8. [LAUGH] Yeah. Once they're 8 and they start realizing, like subversive, you know, maneuvering. Right. Yeah. Well the real question is, when do you buy your kid a phone? That's a whole separate question. I don't even want to go down that. But you know, it's interesting cuz we, the way we grew up, I mean, I don't know about your family. Hm. But in my house, like they, my parents were just not out to lunch when it came to technology. Yeah. Right. I was teaching them. Yeah. Right. Right? There's no monitoring. There's none of that. There's no key logging or anything like that. There's none of that. Not that I knew of. Yeah. I was downloading stuff all over the place. In fact I think I was the only one who was using the computer, because no one else ever interrupted my downloads. Yeah, it was in my room. Wow. They gave, I had the entire world's information and knowledge in my room. Yeah. And my parents were just like oh, he'll never, you know, he'll never use that. That's because they have no idea what, they had no idea what was available on the internet at the time. I really want, I want to talk to, I guess I never like quiz them or not like quiz them but really ask them what they thought this was. Like, do they think this was gonna be a fad that like played out, or did they realized like, oh, it's gonna change the entire planet forever. Yeah, I don't think I'm, as a, you know, I'm not, I'm not a parent right now, obviously, but, I think if I had a kid, I would be more worried about some random stranger contacting my kid through Instagram, or some social network, as opposed to him just reading whatever's available online. You know what I mean? Sure. If he wants to read about deviant stuff, like he'll learn about that eventually. They might just be doing it younger now. Right. And like, that could be detrimental. I guess that's arguable. But, yeah, I'm more worried about predators, like you know, commenting on my kid's Instagram photos or something if it's public. Yeah, you don't wanna get like James Franco'd. Yeah. Which, by the way, I'm pretty sure that's a hoax, man. For a movie, right? Yeah. If you listen to yesterday's episode, we talked about James Franco supposedly getting in trouble by Instagramming some girl and inviting her over to her, his hotel. This, but it did pass the sniff test, I think. It sorta did. Yeah. But then I didn't realize that he was coming out with a movie pretty soon. About a guy who falls in love with a young girl. See, this is the theory I maintain about David Duchovny and Californication and his quote unquote sex addiction. [CROSSTALK] Right. And, of course, this story broke yesterday which is also the same day the trailer came out for that **** movie. I, you know, I don't know. It, it, it, but it was like way too believable. It could happen. Yeah, I'm sure it's happened to other celebrities before. [CROSSTALK] It's on the same level of the Jimmy Kimmel hoaxes, they're so believable. Right. Except the one where the girl caught on fire, that was like almost the perfect storm, it didn't make sense. Right. But the wolf, And the dog, and the Sochi thing? Mm-hm Like, why would you not believe that? [LAUGH] Yeah, orr Nathan Fielder's thing? Yeah, it's perfect. Swimming pigs. But, but, to go back to the thing, like, like I was saying, you know, I, I don't think the, the, they really knew what the internet was gonna be. Right. It, it was hard for them to wrap their heads around it. Mm-hm. In the beginning when we were growing up. And I don't even think I did a good job of, like, understanding what it was. I just thought it was like, oh it's just here for wav files and stuff. Right. Now that you know what you know would you have been comfortable with your parents leaving you with the Internet? Do you want your kids not to see what you saw? Oh Definitely not. Really? I won't ask you what you were looking at. You were learning stuff about things you shouldn't have been. Oh when I was like. I probably first got online for real when, in, like, '94, '95? Yeah. And I knew right away, like, the, you know, well, you learn, the sex thing? Like, you know the porn is going to be, like, a thing right away. Mm-hm, yeah. And I was like, man, there's no filter on this internet. Yeah. I remember for me it was, not, well, of course there was porn. That was one side of it. But the other side of it was also, like, Faces of Death, style videos. Where like, you remember sites like Consumption Junction? [CROSSTALK] That's ,that;s where you and I. You get one link from that website. [CROSSTALK] Or, like, Rotten? Yeah, or Rotten? Yeah, exactly. [CROSSTALK] That's, that's, that's, that's why. See, that's, that's, that's. And stuff like that, I think, I would not like my kids to be watching. That's disturbing stuff. You know, that's when I tend to believe that, you know, you, dude, I'm shocked you're just not in prison, is what I'm say, what I'm trying to say. You don't know what's going on with me. I don't know how he made. Right Ariel? Like, someone that young? I mean, I'm sure, did you have exposure to crap like that? Oh yeah, man. Like, a lot of my friends are super into Faces of Death. It's disgusting. I couldn't watch it, man. It's not my thing. [CROSSTALK] Yeah. Yeah, what is that. Dude, yeah. But it sounds like you're, you're in [INAUDIBLE]. We rented that from the video store before it was available on the internet. [CROSSTALK] You're into that. No. I'm not into it. I'm not like getting off on it. Don't make me out to be a fetishist. It just never stops. If the shoe fits. Oh. Let's move onto this next story before I get in more trouble. Gawker, the whole Gawker team, which includes what, Gizmodo, what are the other Gawker sites? Gizmodo, Jalopnik, IO9. Right. Kataku, our good buddies at Kataku. Mm-hm. Yeah that whole crew. Yeah so yesterday Gawker editor, Max Read sent out a memo to all the employees of the website. And I'm wondering what he said should be applied to CNET as well, because in the memo he basically outlines a new list of rules for what words can and more importantly cannot be used on any Gawker site ever again. So, I don't know it, it's basically just banning internet slang. And it's an effort to sort of legitimize. Class up the joint. Yeah, exactly, legitimize themselves a little bit more. He actually says, we want to sound like regular adult human beings, not Buzzfeed writers or Reddit commenters. Shots fired. Shots fired, but They can't even say things like that. They can't even say shots fired anymore. Because Gawker now hates fun as well. You just can't use any of these words on the site anymore. Well. So he goes on to list. Far be it, hold, please hold your. Yeah. Far be to from me, to be the one, to like, you know, declare classiness, and like solid journalism and stuff. Right. There's part of me that wonders, is Gawker the outlet to do that? Yeah, Gizmodo always does. [CROSSTALK] Because Gizmodo is going to feel this the most and Gawker, proper because they are a celebrity sort of tabloid thing. So that to me, is going to be a big jarring change. But, like what I was saying, I don't want to. You know, let, put labels on sites or anything. But I'm gonna, right now. I mean, you know, I don't associate Gawker with that. What, with like serious news, New York Times journalism? And I'm not saying they're bad, they've broken stories. Of course. But I think, I think part of the charm, allure and attractiveness. Yeah. Of that brand is that. I think a lot of people go to that website because they don't wanna read the serious, like you know, buttoned up, language that New York Times uses. Right. They wanna, like, have fun and. Right. Sorta like take themselves out of work for five minutes. There's no, like, double standard the way, I feel like, BuzzFeed kinda deals, feels that because, they have the ridiculous, you know list articles, and stories. And I think BuzzFeed sorta caters to a younger audience too. [CROSSTALK] Right, but they, but they are very aggressively trying the hard nosed journalism angle as well. And I think they kind of struggle internally with that, and maintaining that delicate balance. Right. But I think the goal should be to have both sides, you know, have a humor driven site or an internet gossip site like Valleywag or whatever, and still like talk snarky. But then, you know, if you wanna break news, do it in a serious way. Here are the words that, that they've sorta lifted that are totally banned. Words like pwn, probably should [CROSSTALK] PWN. Yeah, PWN. OMG, WTF, LOL, all those typical ones. Derp are no longer allowed to be used by the writers. And then, it's not just slang words, too. It's a lot of colloquial terms. Stuff like you know, things that are overused in the internet industry, like massive. Or epic. Or epic. Epic and massive are two words in the English dictionary, that I'm sure. Yeah. I think I understand what, what, what this editor is saying. He doesn't want them used in like, like epic crotch shot or something like that. Like glaringly, yeah, right, right. Or, you know. But massive, I don't understand. Massive, I can sorta see why they would do that, unless it's like MMO. You know, like, you could use that cuz that's, like, definitely a term. [CROSSTALK] Right. Sure, sure, sure. But I think a lot of times headlines these days tend to be over-grabbing, right? Like, where they'll be, I dunno, you, like, sort of flagrant, and eye-catching. But then the story itself won't be as good, and I know a lot of commenters don't like that, and they'll call you out on that if you have sort of link bait. Right? It's just like. Yeah, and stuff like, that just happened. You can't even used that just happened or words like amazeballs. This is gonna change the face, well amazeballs. [CROSSTALK] You shouldn't be using it anyway. If you're, if you're a, a human above the age of 13, really. But they can still say things like selfie. You know what I mean? Like, that's in the Oxford dictionary now but they can still use it. So is derp I bet. Yeah, derp definitely is. Well, so, so and then they really get down to like the bottom of the tank here. Like no LUL's, no, for the win. You know, and I don't, I don't know. I mean, like I said, you can't just do this to a, to a brand that has the reputation of cashing in on this exact way of, of, of delivering. Yeah. You know, stories. Do we use those kinda, that kinda language? I think we do, think we do. I've seen it before. Not like blatantly or overusing it, but. So are they, are they, you know, and I, and I again we, we like Gawker. We for the most part. Yeah, I read Gawker every day. We're just trying to like understand what they're doing. They're in this memo that went out to the company, they're citing a story called, here's a list of all the **** who own guns in New York City. So are they going to continue to like, use that word in headlines and use the F word in headlines? Wait, do they do that? Yea they do, hell yeah. Whoa, I didn't realize that. Like the, Gizmodo will be like, check out this F'n disaster. Right, right. You know, something like that. It works though. It does work. And, and their brand, they've carved out their own sort of unique niche. Mm-hm, mm-hm. So I don't know. You know what I feel we should all get rid of as the human race, is the phrase, that's a thing. Do you know, do you know how people use that sort of, in everyday speech. They'll be like, oh yeah, you know, guys are getting their chest waxed now. Apparently that's a thing now. That's happening now? Which I feel like started, from what, 30 Rock? I'm not upset with that. It's getting overused. I think it. I think it's a perfect way to describe something. That you can't describe. That you can't describe. Yeah, I guess so. Like what's that, the kids they're smoking coffee beans. That's a thing now? Right. Right. I think I'm cool with that. Ariel? You cool with that. Yeah, it doesn't bother me. I'm going to stop saying it. Maybe I overuse it to much in my language. Yeah. Like describing stuff. Like when bell bottoms came back, like oh bell bottoms are back, that's a thing now. Bell bottoms never came back. They came back in the early 90s, and mid-90s. Really? I remember that too. Right, they did. Totally. Probably in San Francisco too. Right. The birthplace of said bell bottoms. Right. Mm-hm. Oy. The bell bottom capital of the world. [LAUGH] San Francisco, California. Those are different from the Ginkgos right? Cuz those were big all the way down? Yeah, Ginkgos were like wearing like industrial pipes on, around your waist. Here's some things to keep in mind the next time you head online to check out a review of a restaurant. Actually, wait. Side note. When was the last time you actually went into a restaurant that you didn't Yelp beforehand? I did that a couple weekends ago, I felt like a savage. Like I felt like I was walking into a random person's house and demanding food. It was so weird. Yeah, like, I'm not familiar with anything here. [LAUGH] Yeah, like, have you guys. When was the last time you went to a restaurant and didn't like go to their website before. Yeah, and have like a five [UNKNOWN] do research beforehand. Yeah, do reconnaissance work. It's crazy to do that, and to think that you know, maybe seven or eight years ago we were doing that. Like it wasn't even a think to be like, oh there it is, like you know, oh let's go into, check the Yelp review of this place. Right. No but you're right. So crazy how much you trust strangers. Right, but that's okay. And that's all crowd sourced. It's the, you know, it's, it's the hive mind collective sort of, you know. But some places have like seven reviews. And if you went down into a subway, like a New York subway station and gathered up seven people. And was like, hey, what do you think about this restaurant? They'll all have seven different opinions. Yeah, and I wouldn't trust any of them. Yeah, but I'm talking about places that have like hundreds. Right. I guess that's sort of trustworthy. And you know what, even, even 15 is a, is a large enough sample size for me. Mm-hm. I I think it really is. Yeah. And as long as there's those, the dates are spread right, out, out enough. [LAUGH] And imagine, it's like all on that Saturday, where like they had a rat infestation. Right. You know. That could be a part of it too. Anyway, what is this all dealing with? Well, so we're talking here about a study at Georgia Tech and Yahoo Labs. They collaborated on a study that showed, that bad weather actually makes online reviewers give negative reviews. I believe it, man. So it's, I mean the, the overarching article is just talking about outside factors that sort of play into an online review, and the stuff you should keep in mind, It's not just bad weather, like you could have a fight with your significant other. Yeah. Going into the meal, and the meal could have been like a five star meal. Right. And you know, you're like yeah, you know what, this thing sucks. Yeah, because you're, you're in you're in the corner. This lobster, this lobster sucked. This surf and turf blew. And it's probably cooked to perfection. Yeah. Right, and. But because you guys are fighting about who can DVR what. Mm-hm. Too real, but no. It's true. Yeah, exactly. Also, I mean you and I both know that writing a negative review, way more fun than writing a positive review. Oh, so much more fun. I mean like, you gotta watch yourself when, especially in our industry, when you're writing a negative review, cause you can really start laying into them unnecessarily. Yeah. And no one's ever like, this is great, you know? Like, that's the problem. Like no one's writing like 500 words on how great a. If, if, it's a slippery slope. Soon, they would just like, and you know what? I don't like the guy's face on the box. Yeah, yeah. [LAUGH] You know, like it's stupid. Yeah, exactly. Oh, and thanks for packing this in the most un-environmentally friendly packaging possible. Yeah. What's with the air conditioning blasting all through my face. [CROSSTALK] Exactly. Stuff like that, so listen, listen to this. They surveyed 1.1 million reviews. Of 840,000 restaurants, so which is funny cuz they're like classifying a review of a review. Right, right, right, right. And they found that customers that visited a restaurant on a rainy day, are more likely to leave a negative review. But then on top of that seasonal, it, it, it affected seasonally, too. Mm. So, they noticed that they got studies found that lower ratings were achieved, but in a higher number of reviews in the months of July and August. Right. So, and they also found that the most negative reviews were left during the coldest and warmest months of the year. Right, cuz you're just miserable in your own skin. Yeah, so any time it was Colder than 40 degrees, but higher than higher than 100, you saw a significant drop in the positive reviews. But now, okay, so we have the data. We have all that. Yeah. It doesn't really change anything. No cuz I'm still going to go to Yelp to check out what's going on. You're still gonna go to Yelp. I think on a long enough timeline, Yeah. You're still gonna get the right review, you're still the, the, the law of averages will eventually take place, and you will, inevitably, get the real dish. yeah, okay, so I think with restaurants for example, if you go on a Yelp review, the problem is that the rating isn't broken down like ours is. Right. Right? Like, so you can't see the difference between like a bad customer service experience, versus finding like a band-aid in your food. You know what I mean? Like those two things, are very different. Quality of food versus quality of service. I feel like those things should be separated. Do you think Yelp, and we're saying Yelp specifically, cuz they're obviously the most popular, you know, restaurant review place on the internet. Yeah. Do you think it's not easy enough to do a review? What do you mean? I wonder, and I don't know if this is the right way to do it, but I wonder if you have a simple system. And the reason I bring this up, is because I, I, I use Uber a lot now. Uh-huh. And like the second you're done with Uber, you just right away click a star. Right. And that's the review they get. Mm-hm. And your done. What if Yelp adopted a similar customer review, practice where, you go through like, you, you left the place, maybe click on what you had. Mm-hm. And then you click like three different categories of stars, to dictate. And then if you go below a certain threshold, a little dialog box pops up and goes, okay why did you give it under three stars. Give it more. Right. Or why'd you give it more, or something like that. Right, right, right. Maybe that's the way to do it. I like that, yeah. A little quick survey. That's it, I mean. No one takes those surveys, though. Well, not a survey, but, you know, people, they give it, like, stars, right? Yeah. And that's the whole experience. Right. They don't rate x, y, z. It's just like the general experience. Yeah. And I think that there's too much you know, wiggle room in that. I don't know. I think at the end of the day, like there are certain, there are like two types of people. One that will always review something, whether it's good or bad. And like the other side. Which sounds like the 3 of us. Who just don't give a crap and would rather read, but not participate. Right it's a, it's a one way street for us. It's like the people that are commenting on stuff on the internet, like we don't trust them for anything like Youtube reviews. It's so funny because they are the same people. They are the same people that actually interact with the internet. Right the dickhead who's like first is also like writing the hundred word reviews. Yeah, right. So like why are we, why are we trusting him in other websites but then in reviews. It's the same thing with Amazon too. Right. You know, Amazon, you know, and people like, and do people just like give bad reviews because of other factors. Mm-hm. Like oh, UPS did a **** job. Right. So I'm gonna give them like, you know, it's crazy. Mm-hm. But that's why you have professional review sites, like CNET.com. True. Do yourself a favor. Next time you're hungry just go out and eat at the first place that you see, and just let me know how that goes. Yeah. I think you're kinda playing with fire there a little bit. Just what looks good. That's the old school style. Just check, check out the menu that's posted on the door. Don't you think that's a little dangerous like, I don't know. There was a new place to open up in Hoboken called Tony Baloney's. [LAUGH] And you went there? [LAUGH] See you could tell by little things. Like the name Tony Baloney's. Are you making funny, fun. [LAUGH] Are you making funny? Are you making funny? [LAUGH] Anthony Baloney is a freaking well established franchise. From Atlantic City. Are you serious? Yeah, dude, They make bologna sandwiches? Oh God. Or is his last name spelled differently? No it's Tony Boloney in beautiful Hoboken New Jersey. Okay. Glorious. Here's the website, there he is Anthony Boloney, okay. [LAUGH] Just opened in Hoboken. How you doing, how you doing? All class, all class. So I knew the reputation the restaurant had in, don't make faces. What kind of face are you making you right now, dude? I'm making faces because they describe themselves as erotic pizza. Yes. What does that mean? Sensual pizza. Ew. Yeah! That seems to me like the, yeah, that sounds gross. You know, you can enjoy your food emotionally. Yeah. [LAUGH] As well as in terms of quenching hunger. Okay. So, I knew that there was a reputable restaurant down in AC. Mm-hm. So, I said hey, I don't need to read a freakin' Yelp review. These guys got a good legacy. Right. I'm gonna go right in and, and eat. Uh-huh. And it was great. Oh, it was good. You liked it? It was good. Anthony Baloney Wait, they're saying that some of their food is shaped phallically. Do they make pizza? In that way? Do you know what I'm talking about? Like, like, like **** pizza? That's what I'm hearing, yeah. No, no, no. All their pizza is, resembles circles. The way most people eat a pizza. Yeah. Huh, it is weird. This review, he, this review's totally incorrect. No, I wouldn't have known that. Don't worry about it. What the hell is the point I am trying to make, I can't even remember it. The point is that you should trust reviews before you go into a restaurant. Can I give you a little like, a little side thing before we say goodbye for the week? Yeah. I've been using Uber a lot like I just said. And I want to talk for just a little bit, you use Uber a lot? I've used it a few times, yeah. Arielle, Uber? I use it. I've used it a few times. I've been, I probably used it in the last week, I probably used it six times in the last week. So for people who don't know. Uber is the on-demand car service, service, that you drop a pin on the app. Uh-huh. They, they, pick you up. They tell you what kinda car. You tell the guy where you wanna go. There's not money changes hands, it's all over the, it's all digital. It's all credit card transactions and what not. So I was coming back from a show in Brooklyn last night and I took Uber back to Hoboken. And the prices are very competitive, that's why it's so popular. So, I've been in all these Uber rides. Every single car ride that I'm in. Mm-hm. With an Uber driver, is some of the most insightful conversations I've ever had. Yeah. Right? Like, every single, every single time I drive in an uber, I take an uber ride, you know, the drivers, they're, they're new at it too, and everyone's sort of like, they just, no one can like catch up with the fact of how great Uber is. Right. And you know, they always, they always want to talk about how new the service is. And a lot of them talk about like you know, their family, and how like Uber's like saving their family because they're making money. Yeah, they're just normal people that. Yeah. Use their cars for this extra job. A lot of them have separate jobs. Yeah, for sure. I just, and I mean, maybe I've taken a total of like 25 Uber rides now. And the best majority of those rides have been like very interesting conversations with people. Right. And I'm always just like, kinda like, like man, not only is this cheaper than a taxi cab. Mm-hm. Not only is this way easier than a taxi cab. But now I'm getting like, the benefit of like an insightful human conversation. Yeah, that makes everything that much better. And your, you feel safe too. Which is so weird. And the cars are clean because they're not taxi cabs. And someone didn't just poop in the back. Right. You know what I mean? Which has happened. Yeah. and, and there's like, I don't know, maybe it's like the clientele. Mm-hm. Sorta thing. I don't know. Yeah, it's pretty cool. I highly recommend it. It's definitely way more expensive than if you were to just hop in a taxi. Well now there's certain situations where it is and where it isn't. If you're just taking, and, this is obviously in, in our New York bubble, but if you are taking a ride within New York, yes, Yellow Cab is still gonna be the way to go. Okay. It's gonna be the cheapest way to go. Mm-hm. But for me, in Hoboken, when I doing, like, a Hoboken to Jersey City ride. Oh, okay. It was way cheaper when, than what a car service would have been? [CROSSTALK] Oh really? Oh, yeah. Car serve would have been twenty bucks, Uber eight. Wait, on Uber, can you specify the amount first? No. Oh, so you can't like. You can tell Uber where you're going. Right. And get like a quote. But they're not tied to that quote. Oh okay, but you can't, set the quote yourself. No. And then whatever [CROSSTALK] Not like name your price. Yeah, okay. Nothing like that. But I recommend it too, it's a really comfortable ride, it's usually much better conversation than just talking to that monitor. Yeah. In the back of taxi cabs. Right. I hate those things. Right. Yeah. yeah. I recommend it too. You know, they just seem happier. Yeah. They just seem happier. Right. And they're never on the phone when they're driving. Never on the phone. You know it's funny. I and sometimes you get lucky. Like I ordered an Uber X, which is like usually the hybrids of the small sedans. Mm-hm. And I guess there were like no like, other uber cars in range, and, and you know, range. Yeah. And we got a freakin' Escalade. Oh that's awesome. Like me and [UNKNOWN] riding in an Escalade. Yeah. To go back to our house. Check it out, [CROSSTALK] Ballers, yeah it was cool. Alright that's it. I wanna, I wanna hear if you have had a similar Uber experience. Let us know, write us the404@cnet.com. Follow us on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, reddit, and all that fantastic stuff. Yeah. Alright? We're back here on Monday. Right? You're, you're? Yeah, I'm back here on Monday for my last week of shows before this crazy vacation. That's right. So, you better be here next week. Until then, I'm Jeff Bakalar. I'm Justin Yu. And I'm Ariel Nunez. This has been the 404 show. High tech, low brow. Thank you for joining us. We'll see you guys on Monday. [MUSIC]

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