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DIY string tripod: How To Video

About Video Transcript

How To Video: DIY string tripod

2:38 /

With just two ingredients, Sharon Vaknin shows you how to make a simple tripod alternative that you can take with you on the go.

Hey, guys. I'm Sharon Vaknin for CNET and if you need to take photos in a low light setting or need to do the longest exposure for any other reason. A tripod usually comes in handy. The thing is they're so bulky and heavy, you can't count on them being there with you all the time. So, today I'll show you how to make a tripod out of a bolt and some string to steady your shot. To get started, you need an i-Bolt of a quarter inch in width and some string or cord. The thicker, the better in this situation, but today, I'm just using some regular old string. You're gonna want it out of length about three times your height. So, just get a rough measurement, like so. Then tie the two ends together. Now, all you have to do is put it through the eye of the bolt to create a loop knot. When you're done with that, your tripod is ready to go. To use your tripod or 'String Pod' as I like to call it, just screw it into a hole where the tripod will usually go in the camera. This is a standard size, so a quarter inch will fit for all cameras. Once it's screwed in tightly, you're ready to use your tripod. So, turn on your camera and set it to the settings that you'd like, whether it's a long exposure or a long shutter speed. To position the camera where you wanted, step on the string with two feet and ignore all the weird glances you got while you do this, and pull up on the camera to study your shot. As you can see, I'm using tension to study the camera. Another useful tip is to keep your elbows and arms at your side, so make for an extra study shot. You can also set the self timer so that the press of the shutter doesn't shake your camera. I tested this setup last night where a long shutter speed was useful and as you can see, here is the difference between a shot that was taken without the String Pod and a shot that was taken with the String Pod. It's a lot clearer. The String Pod will replace the traditional tripod but if you need to pack light or you're traveling, this setup will come in handy for steady shots. If you have any questions, hit me up on Twitter and subscribe to my Facebook page for more tips like this. For CNET.com, I'm Sharon Vaknin.

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