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CNET News Video: Control your computer from afar with Myo armband

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CNET News Video: Control your computer from afar with Myo armband

1:45 /

Thalmic Labs has created an alternative to the mouse and keyboard. The new Myo device uses muscle sensors to understand your gestures, letting you use your hands to play video games, swipe through slides, or turn up your tunes.

-Notice anything missing from this Powerpoint presentation-- maybe the clicker? And this video game is being played without a controller-- the tech that makes that possible, Myo, an armband that understands how your arm, hand, and fingers move thanks to a built-in processor and 8 muscle sensors. -So, it pick up these tiny signals that come from your muscles. You know, when I'm gonna go to make a fist, my brain is sending these impulses down my nerves. -Made by Thalmic Labs, the $150 Myo lets you control computers and devices with your motions. -And then all those signals that are sent into that little processor and here that's been trained using machine learning to recognize which different muscles correspond to different gestures. -Just a recognition technology isn't new. There's the popular Kinect from Microsoft and the Leap motion controller precisely tracks all fingers. But unlike those devices, Myo doesn't use cameras, so users aren't limited to a specific area. -There's this like the old problem with gesture control, they called the Gorilla Arm Syndrome and that's-- 'cause the camera has to see me, it have to be able like this to do it. And so with this technology, you know, I can be sitting here, my arm on my side and go ahead and take control over the device. -The armband connects the devices via low-energy Bluetooth and has a range of 50 feet, so you could turn up your favorite tracks streaming on your laptop from across the room. The model Thalmic Labs expects to sell to the public later this year will be thinner and lighter than this developer's version. But are consumers willing to wear an armband? Maybe not while they're replying to email. But you might be able to tempt them with a drone. In San Francisco, I'm Sumi Das, CNET for CBS News.

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