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Meet Twitter's Jack Dorsey, comic action hero

Move over, Batman. Twitter co-founder Jack Dorsey fights crime 140 characters at a time in his very own comic. Crave's Bonnie Burton talks to writer Patrick McCray.

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Google's first-quarter earnings (pictures)

Google reported first-quarter earnings that didn't meet analyst expectations. Here's a look at how the Web giant summed up its earnings.

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Google pleads growing pains as earnings miss expectations

Google says its acquisition of big-name startups like Nest and DeepMind, along with an uneven shift to mobile advertising, forced earnings below analyst expectations.

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If you want to spot a liar, trust your gut, research says

Research from UC Berkeley suggests that instinct is a far better judge of the mendacious than is any rational process.

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Mirror, meet tech companies. Tech companies, meet mirror

Tech companies are rampant in their criticism of the NSA. But is there really any difference between the way they treat ordinary citizens and the way that the government does?

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Google buys Nest for £1.9bn to put apps in your home appliances

Google is spending £1.9bn to snap up Nest, a company that connects your home to the Internet.

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Some of the big moments in tech this past year ranged from space to spacey, and human biology to humanoid robots. Here's a collection of images that represent 2013's big stories, with innovation an overriding theme. 
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We've chosen the images for their impact. Robots have advanced and become more animalistic or human-like. Private companies have rocketed into space. And some of the images are arty expressions of our world through sculpture and light.
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Virgin Galactic's <a href="http://news.cnet.com/8301-19514_3-57601804-239/get-up-close-and-supersonic-with-virgin-galactics-spaceshiptwo/" >SpaceShipTwo</a>, for example, billed as the world's first commercial space plane, notched an important milestone by <a href="http://news.cnet.com/8301-17938_105-57581868-1/spaceshiptwo-fires-rocket-engine-in-supersonic-flight/" >firing its rocket engine</a> during flight on April 29. It was a test flight at Mojave Air and Space Port in California. 
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During the flight, the space-ready passenger <a href="http://news.cnet.com/8301-17938_105-57581868-1/spaceshiptwo-fires-rocket-engine-in-supersonic-flight/" >space plane detached</a> from its dual-hull mothership, WhiteKnightTwo, at an altitude of 47,000 feet while being piloted by Mark Stucky and Mike Alsbury of builder Scaled Composites.
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2013: The year in pictures

From human biology to humanoid robots, we take you on a visual journey back through the year, with innovation an overriding theme.

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Apple, Google and Microsoft join forces to slam NSA

Apple, Google, Microsoft and five other tech giants have joined forces to demand much stricter limits on the US National Security Agency.

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BlackBerry flirts with Facebook, and there's something fishy going on in the San Francisco Bay.

Google barges onto the Bay

BlackBerry flirts with Facebook, and there's something fishy going on in the San Francisco Bay.

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<p>Technology's richest can't seem to stay away from wacky desires -- to live forever, to colonize other planets, to recreate the plot line of "Deep Impact," minus the apocalypse. Here's a quick tour of some of the most <a href="http://news.cnet.com/8301-10797_3-57608544-235/billion-dollar-babies-far-out-pet-projects-of-the-tech-elite/">far-out pet projects of the tech billionaires club</a>.</p>



<p> Tesla Motors and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk isn't content with being a real-life inspiration for "Iron Man's" Tony Stark. No, he'd like to expand from superhero to secret agent, specifically James Bond. So he purchased a <a href="http://news.cnet.com/8301-1023_3-57608010-93/elon-musk-is-the-anonymous-buyer-of-the-james-bond-lotus-submarine/" >Lotus Esprit submarine from the 1979 film</a>, "The Spy Who Loved Me," for $1 million at auction. He hopes to infuse it with some Tesla magic and a dash of millionaire mad genius. 

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"It was amazing as a little kid in South Africa to watch James Bond in 'The Spy Who Loved Me' drive his Lotus Esprit off a pier, press a button, and have it transform into a submarine underwater. I was disappointed to learn that it can't actually transform," Musk said. "What I'm going to do is upgrade it with a Tesla electric powertrain and try to make it transform for real."

Tech billionaires chase their wildest dreams (pictures)

Given the wealth concentrated in Silicon Valley, it's no surprise that tech CEOs and founders put their money toward the seemingly impossible, on land, on sea, and in space.

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The concept of the Google Doodle was born on August 30, 1998 when company co-founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin placed a simple stick-figure drawing behind the second "o" in the word Google. This first Google logo art was intended as a message to the site's users that the founders were "out of office" at the <a href="http://news.cnet.com/8300-5_3-0.html?keyword=burning+man" >Burning Man festival</a>. 
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While this first little doodle was a relatively simple sketch, the idea of decorating the Google logo to celebrate notable events was born -- a tradition which is today stronger than ever. As the doodles have continued to grow, new technologies have led to more complex, entertaining, and creative artistic concepts. Today, Google employs a team of illustrators and engineers known as "Doodlers" to brighten up the Google home page.

Our favorite Google Doodles through the years (pictures)

Growing out of a simple "out of office" nod to Burning Man, the Google Doodle has turned into a regular decorative tribute. Here's a look back at some of the most memorable of the bunch.

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<p>The computerization of cars has already begun, but the technology will take off dramatically now with the mobile Internet and self-driving vehicles.</p><p>

This self-driving Nissan Leaf, for example, is a prototype that the company says will lead to self-driving vehicles in mass production by 2020.</p><p>
Click on for more technology that's changing the auto industry, or read <a href="http://news.cnet.com/8301-11386_3-57595738-76/how-googles-robo-cars-mean-the-end-of-driving-as-we-know-it/">CNET's stories on the marriage of computing technology and cars</a>.

Cars and computers: A look at the future of autos (pictures)

The computerization of cars has already begun, but the technology will take off dramatically now with the mobile Internet and self-driving vehicles. Here's a look at technology that's changing the auto industry.

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