Nokia C6 review: Nokia C6

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Typical Price: £250.00
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1.5 stars

CNET Editors' Rating

3 stars 4 user reviews

The Good Wi-Fi and HSDPA connectivity for speedy browsing; Qwerty keyboard; free Ovi Maps sat-nav app; customisable home-screen widgets.

The Bad Resistive touchscreen; sluggish performance; dated, unintuitive user interface; poor app store; flaky connectivity; looks cheap.

The Bottom Line With a cheap-looking case, dull resistive touchscreen and an operating system that even Nokia is tired of, the C6 doesn't have much to recommend it

Visit manufacturer site for details.

3.5 Overall

The Nokia C6 looks and feels like a poor man's N97, or more accurately N97 mini, except it's not actually that cheap. The C6 suffers from the worst excesses of the N97's software, without the saving grace of its solid hardware, resulting in a phone that's disappointing at any price.

The C6 is available for free on a £25-a-month, two-year contract. You can also pick it up SIM-free for £250.

Slip and slide

The C6 is a slider phone that looks, from a distance, like the N97, which was last year's top-of-the-range Nokia phone and turned out to be a bottom-of-the-pile disappointment. Up close, however, the C6 looks and feels much cheaper. The slider mechanism is reassuringly solid and springy, but the case itself is dull and plasticky.

The three buttons beneath the resistive touchscreen work well, although we found that the call-end button, which also turns the phone off, is far too quick to shut down the handset when you press it for a moment. The buttons also seem stranded in the empty space at the bottom of the phone, which strikes us as poor design.

The C6 is rather chubby too. You can blame that on the full Qwerty keyboard that slides out from under the screen. We found the keyboard to be of average quality. More travel and space between the keys would be welcome. We had no trouble typing accurately with it, however.

Symbian cynic

We've never been fans of Nokia's attempts to shoehorn its Symbian operating system into a touchscreen phone, a ploy the company first tried with the 5800 XpressMusic. We're now running out of patience with a user interface that even Nokia has admitted is deeply flawed.

Beware the call-end button drifting below the resistive touchscreen -- press it for too long and the phone will turn itself off 

Small irritations, like the need to double tap items to open them or the constant prompting about which network connection to use, soon develop into a genuine overall dislike. Without a good-looking case or innovative features to weigh on the positive side of the equation, the C6 isn't left with much to recommend it.

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