Grado PS1000 review: Grado PS1000

Since the PS1000s are made in Brooklyn, we decided to start our listening sessions with a Brooklyn band, Oakley Hall. The group's "I'll Follow You" CD sounded great, with the sort of full-bodied dynamic swing you rarely hear from contemporary rock CDs. Patrick Sullivan and Rachel Cox's twin lead vocals were natural and clear.

The Grado RS-1i headphones ($695) have been our reference for years, so we know their sound well. Switching back and forth between RS-1i and PS1000, the difference can be summed up with one word: scale. The RS-1i is still great, but it's more closed-in, more "inside the head" sounding. Stereo imaging is much wider over the PS1000, but it's also more spacious. The RS-1i is dimensionally flatter, and then there's the bass. Yes, with the PS1000 there's more of it, but the quality, depth, and palpable bass texture come through like never before. Listening to any decent-sounding acoustic jazz CD, we were much more aware of the bass player's contributions.

The treble is likewise better resolved and clear. Cymbals sizzle more and they have greater presence through the PS1000s. But rather than try to describe different frequency ranges, it's the entirety of the sound that's a huge advance over what we've heard before from Grado.

DVDs and Blu-rays sounded pretty terrific over the PS1000s. Listening over our Onkyo TX-SR805 receiver, the circle of drums scene from the "House of Flying Daggers" DVD had tremendous impact and the sound of each drum thwack was clearly defined. It was undoubtedly better than Sennheiser's flagship HD 800 headphones in that regard. To hear this level of detail over speakers you'd need to spend at least five times the cost of the PS1000s.

For CDs and SACDs we switched over to our Woo Audio WA6 Special Edition headphone amplifier. A great-sounding SACD like "Symphonic Dances" with Keith Lockhart conducting the Utah Symphony Orchestra put the PS1000s' strengths in perspective. Notably, it was the scale of the sound, the orchestra was huge, and during the music's quieter interludes we could hear the sound filling the Abravanel Hall in Salt Lake City. The strings were the perfect combination of clear and naturally warm. When the orchestra performs "West Side Story," the dynamic jolts were fully reproduced--the PS1000s are state of the art in that area.

The Ultrasone Edition 8 headphones sounded very different with the same recording. First, the closed-back Edition 8s produced a smaller stereo image, but their bass went deeper and was more powerful. The Edition 8s' weighty tonal balance were closer to a set of full-size tower speakers. Those headphones deliver more of the gravitas of a big score like "West Side Story" than either the Grado PS1000 or the Sennheiser HD 800 headphones. Comparing the PS1000 with the Sennheiser HD 800, the Grado has a bit more bass and has much greater presence and immediacy. The Sennheiser HD 800, meanwhile, is even more spacious-sounding than the Grado, though the it may be too distant sounding for some listeners.

Finally, we connected the PS1000 to our iPod to check out some uncompressed and lossless digital music. Hearing that kind of sound quality from the iPod was really pretty amazing.

The PS1000s may not be the best headphones on every count--the Sennheiser HD 800s are more comfortable and offer a sound that's arguably a tad more "accurate"--but they're definitely the best Grado headphones ever made.

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    Grado PS1000

    Part Number: PS1000 Released: 15 Aug 2009
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    Quick Specifications See All

    • Regional specs shown for US. UK specs are unavailable.

    • Release date 15 Aug 2009
    • Color Black
    • Sound Output Mode stereo
    • Additional Features Open acoustic seal
      Open-back earcups
      Metal-framed outer grill structure
      Dynamic driver
    • Type headphones
    • Headphones Form Factor ear-cup
    • Connector Type phone stereo 6.3 mm