2009 Toyota Matrix S AWD review: 2009 Toyota Matrix S AWD

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CNET Editors' Rating

2.5 stars OK
  • Overall: 5.7
  • Cabin tech: 6.0
  • Performance tech: 5.0
  • Design: 6.0
Review Date:
Updated on:

The Good The 2008 Toyota Matrix's all-wheel drive offers extra grip in slippery conditions. A good navigation system is available, and the car has practical interior space.

The Bad You can't get navigation as an option in a Matrix with the upgraded audio system and Bluetooth. The four-speed automatic transmission feels primitive and leads to mediocre fuel economy.

The Bottom Line The 2009 Toyota Matrix, when equipped with all-wheel drive, works as a practical car for people living in wintery regions. However, it forces some pricey technology trade-offs and doesn't let you have it all.

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Editors' note: Toyota issued a recall for vehicles of this model and year on January 21, 2010 to replace the accelerator pedal mechanism, which has been known to get stuck, causing unintended acceleration. For the latest recall information, please visit the Toyota Web site.

When Toyota launched the Matrix in 2002, the advertising emphasized its technology features, including navigation and an AC outlet, rare features for a car in this price bracket at that time. Since then, other inexpensive cars, such as the Mitsubishi Lancer and Honda Civic Si, offer advanced tech options, but the 2009 Toyota Matrix keeps up with the pack, updating its technology to include Bluetooth cell phone integration.

The funky shape of the Matrix also heralded Toyota's signature funky brand, Scion. The Matrix retains the odd body style, along with all the practical interior space that body design affords. Our test car was the middle S trim model with all-wheel drive. The car is also available in a base model and XRS top trim model. The S trim is the only version that Toyota lets you combine with an all-wheel-drive system, which also forces the choice of the larger 2.4-liter four-cylinder engine and four-speed automatic.

Test the tech: Matrix recharge
Our test car was sadly lacking in tech options, only having the base stereo, with no navigation or Bluetooth. So we put its 110 volt AC outlet to the test. We got an HP Pavilion DV1000 laptop and a Cowon A3 media player, and drained the batteries down to nothing. Then we took them down to the car and, using a power strip, plugged them both into the Matrix's AC power outlet.


We recharge a couple of devices with the car's AC power outlet.

You have to push a button to turn on the juice, as the AC outlet isn't on by default, and the car has to be running. We left the car idling and the AC outlet live for 30 minutes while we went to lunch. When we got back, we looked at the power meters on the HP Pavilion and the Cowon A3. The laptop showed a 60 percent charge on the battery, while the media player was all the way up at 75 percent. We were impressed, as these charge levels were equivalent to what the devices would have shown if they were plugged into a wall outlet.

In the cabin
The interior of the 2009 Toyota Matrix feels well built, and the materials are on a par with cars in the $20,000 range. There wasn't much to signify that the Matrix is a tech car. The instrument cluster has a small, paper white LCD that shows odometer information and the current drive mode from the automatic transmission. We were hoping for more advanced trip computer information, such as range to empty and current fuel economy.


The base stereo shows track information from MP3s on its radio display.

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Where to Buy

2009 Toyota Matrix S AWD

Part Number: 100981681
Pricing is currently unavailable.

Quick Specifications See All

  • Regional specs shown for US. UK specs are unavailable.

  • Trim levels S
  • Body style Sedan
  • Available Engine Gas