Microsoft unveiled the new operating system on 10 November 1983 -- but how did Windows take over the offices, schools and homes of almost every computer user in the world and make Bill Gates the richest man in the world?

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Version 1.0 came with the legendary art software Paint, as well as Windows Writer and Notepad.

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A calculator, calendar, card file and clock helped you manage your 1980s Filofax.

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You could even play a game, the strategy board game Reversi, seen here on the top left.

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Uh-oh! The precursor to the stop error screen, which became known as the 'Blue Screen of Death'.

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In 1987, Windows 2.0 came with the same applications, but you could now resize and overlap windows. Control panel and keyboard shortcuts were also new.

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With improved icons, a whopping 16 colours, and classic time-wasters Solitaire, Hearts and Minesweeper all included in version 3.0, modern Windows started to take shape.

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In Windows 3.0 you could change the background to display a pattern or bitmap image. The new Windows Paintbrush supported BMP and PCX files.

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Version 3.1 added Apple's TrueType fonts, based on a scaleable outline, or glyph, rather than blocky pixels.

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Windows For Workgroups included Microsoft Mail, which could send email via PostOffice to other users on a network.

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The background and themes could be personalised if you had decent graphics kit.

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A version of Windows 3.0 included Multimedia Extensions, including the Music Box CD player and a Sound Recorder.

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Windows 3.2 was only released in China.

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The control panel.

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Windows 95 arrived in 1995.

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The new Start menu was heralded by the famous -- and enormously expensive -- use of the Rolling Stones' Start Me Up.

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Subtle 3D effects and gradients were added to the look in 1995.

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Clippy appeared in Microsoft Office between 1997 and 2003. His real name is Clippit. Kill it! Kill it with fire!

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Ouch. This is how things went bad in the old days.

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You could embed a website in your Windows 98 desktop, complete with clickable links.

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Look -- it's the verdant rolling hills and comforting blue skies of Windows XP.

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XP required users to activate their copy with a 50-number code over the Web. Couldn't be simpler!

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When you searched for something, Microsoft sent in Rover Retriever, the star of Microsoft BOB -- an unsucessful program that represented your desktop as the inside of a house.

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On XP, you can change themes. Pretty.

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Uh-oh! We've all been there.

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In 2006, Vista introduced all manner of fancy 3D effects including the Aero interface and Flip 3D.

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In 2009, Windows 7 arrived in a blaze of confusion.

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Windows 7 supported multitouch on the screen of your PC, letting you zoom, rotate and navigate with your greasy fingers.

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Windows 8 comes with a dramatic new look: colourful boxes on the home screen for each app, called Live Tiles.

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You can customise your home screen with your favourite apps and widgets.

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The touch-friendly Live Tiles are great for tablets, so Microsoft is launching its own slate, the Surface, alongside Windows 8.

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Windows 8.1 reinstated some of the more traditional elements of Windows, like a Start button.

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Microsoft unveiled the  follow-up to its Windows 8 operating system, which will be known as Windows 10, on September 30, 2014.

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Old is new again with the Windows 10 Start menu.

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That's quite enough Windows for one day. This will end your Windows session.

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This will REALLY end your Windows session.

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