Same old, same old

The Samsung Galaxy Tab 2 7.0 4G LTE (Verizon) is a real long name. It's also the 4G version of the WiFi-only tablet that was released a few months back in mid-2012. The new tablet costs $100 more than the $250 version, putting it at $150 more than the $200 Google Nexus 7. Read full review
Updated:
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Editors' Rating
3 stars
Pricing is currently unavailable.

Resolution

The tablet's screen resolution is 1,024x768 pixels, which is disappointing thanks to the 1,280x800-pixel Nexus 7. Read full review
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Editors' Rating
3 stars
Pricing is currently unavailable.

Expand

The microSD card slot now supports cards of up to 64GB and the SIM card means you'll actually be connecting to a cellular service. Read full review
Updated:
Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET / Caption by:
Editors' Rating
3 stars
Pricing is currently unavailable.

Slight upgrade

The back camera gets a slight upgrade from 3-megapixel to 3.2-megapixel. Or they could be the same camera and Samsung was just rounding down with the previous tablet. From here you can also see another definite change: the addition of a textured back. Read full review
Updated:
Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET / Caption by:
Editors' Rating
3 stars
Pricing is currently unavailable.

IR

The IR blaster (kind of Samsung's tablet claim to fame) returns and along with the Peel software transforms the tablet into a remote control for your TV. Read full review
Updated:
Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET / Caption by:
Editors' Rating
3 stars
Pricing is currently unavailable.

Charge space

The dual speakers aren't anything special, sporting adequate song quality. Read full review
Updated:
Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET / Caption by:
Editors' Rating
3 stars
Pricing is currently unavailable.

Choices

The Nexus 7 has a faster processor, a higher screen resolution, Android 4.1, and NFC, and costs $200. The Galaxy counters with 4G LTE, storage expansion, IR Blaster, dual cameras, and mobile hot spot, and runs for $350, plus usage fees. Depending on your needs this could be a difficult choice, but I think $350 is still too much for a tablet of the Galaxy's relatively meager capabilities. Read full review
Updated:
Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET / Caption by:
Editors' Rating
3 stars
Pricing is currently unavailable.
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