The HTC HD7 is the pick of the Windows Phone 7 crop so far. As such, we've given the new smart phone an almighty fondling, and can now present you with the attendant photos.

The six handsets that were unveiled yesterday at the launch of Microsoft's new operating system are similar both in terms of specs and appearance. The HD7's stand-out feature is its huge touchscreen. At 4.3 inches, it trumps that of the HTC 7 Mozart (3.7 inches) and HTC 7 Trophy (3.8 inches). It also bests the 3.8-inch screen of the LG Optimus 7, 4.1-inch display of the Dell Venue Pro, and 4-inch panel of the Samsung Omnia 7.

The HD7's large screen gives you plenty of space to prod the Windows Phone 7 interface, as well as watch videos, view photos and browse the Web via Wi-Fi and 3G. Alas, it also makes the handset feel rather awkward in your palm, although that's probably something you'll get used to in time. The fact that the phone is only 11mm thick means it's not an unpleasant handful.

Unlike previous mobile operating systems from Microsoft, Windows Phone 7 features large, finger-friendly icons. The home screen shown in the photo above provides quick access to your contacts, call history, text messages, emails, the Internet, Xbox Live and your calendar. Scroll down and you'll also be able to access your pictures, music and videos, alter the phone's settings and browse Microsoft's app store, although its shelves are still relatively bare.

Scroll to the right of the home screen and you'll be presented with a list of the phone's apps and features. Accessing apps is a zippy experience, thanks to the HD7's responsive capacitive touchscreen and snappy 1GHz processor. 

On the back of the phone, there's a 5-megapixel camera. It's accompanied by two LED lights, which should prove useful for recording incriminating 720p footage of drunk colleagues in poorly lit watering holes late at night. There's 8GB of built-in memory for storing your movies, but no microSD card slot, which will be frustrating if you need to add more space.

The HD7's posterior also sports a flip-out stand for propping the phone up. That will come in useful if your laziness has reached such a pitch you can no longer bear to hold a phone in your hands when watching video. 

Click through our photo gallery to see the HD7 strut its stuff, and spill your brain syrup in the comments section below. You can read our full review of the HD7 at midnight tomorrow night, when it will replace our spiffing preview.

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Your list of apps and features is just a swipe away from the main home screen.
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A 5-megapixel camera is lodged in the HD7's posterior.
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You can prop up the phone by folding out this nifty stand.
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