Windows losing to Linux in the developer war

Evans Data is reporting that developer interest in Windows is waning. Slowly, but waning all the same, as interest in Linux continues to grow.

The sky is not falling for Microsoft, but it's sure starting to look cloudy. No wonder the company keeps trying to make thunder about patent infringement. The US Supreme Court under Justic Roberts has become less activist than in previous decades, as the WSJ reports: let's hope that the courts won't be the last bastion for market share in the software world, either.

Evans Data, as reported by Paul Krill at Infoworld, just completed a survey of North American developers and found the following:

A survey this spring of more than 400 developers and IT managers in North America found that the number of developers targeting Windows for their applications declined 12 percent from a year ago. Just 64.8 percent targeted the platform as opposed to 74 percent in 2006....

The share for Windows is expected to drop another 2-percent, to about 63 percent, in the next year....

The targeting of Linux by developers increased by 34 percent to 11.8 percent. It had been 8.8 a year ago, according to the survey. Linux targeting is expected to reach 16 percent over the next year.

This correlates nicely with data that I've been collecting from Alfresco, SugarCRM, MySQL, and other open source vendors. Windows continues to be the evaluation platform of choice for many developers, but when it's time to go into production...a majority opt for Linux. I'll be blogging these results in the next two weeks - stay tuned.

Via LinuxToday.

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Tech Culture
About the author

    Matt Asay is chief operating officer at Canonical, the company behind the Ubuntu Linux operating system. Prior to Canonical, Matt was general manager of the Americas division and vice president of business development at Alfresco, an open-source applications company. Matt brings a decade of in-the-trenches open-source business and legal experience to The Open Road, with an emphasis on emerging open-source business strategies and opportunities. He is a member of the CNET Blog Network and is not an employee of CNET. You can follow Matt on Twitter @mjasay.

     

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