Wi-Fi is killing trees, study finds

Trees placed closest to Wi-Fi radiation showed a "lead like" shine on leaves, as well as the death of leaves' lower and upper epidermis, Dutch researchers say.

tree in a forest
Unlike trees in urban areas, trees in wooded areas remain happy and healthy, the study says. Crave UK

Enjoying reading the latest technology news and reviews here on Crave? Hope you're pleased with yourself, because you may be killing a tree. Researchers from Wageningen University in the Netherlands have discovered the sad news that Wi-Fi makes trees sick.

The tree-loving folks of Dutch city Alphen aan den Rijn commissioned the study, whose results have not yet been published, after finding abnormalities on trees that couldn't be explained by known viral or bacterial infections.

Over the last five years, the study found that all deciduous trees in the Western world are affected by radiation from mobile-phone networks and wireless LANs.

Read more of " Wi-Fi is killing trees, study finds " at Crave UK.

About the author

Rich Trenholm is a senior editor at CNET where he covers everything from phones to bionic implants. Based in London since 2007, he has travelled the world seeking out the latest and best consumer technology for your enjoyment.

 

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