Video: Man eats more than 140 pieces of sushi to promote video game

The lengths people go to promote things these days. Tim Janus shows Crave he's all business when it comes to sushi rolls.

Earlier today, competitive eater Tim Janus (aka "Eater X") made a guest appearance at the Nintendo Media summit in downtown San Francisco to show off his prowess eating Sushi rolls. Nintendo's public relations had put together a "guess how many jelly beans are in the jar" situation by making attendees estimate the number of sushi rolls Janus would be consuming within a six minute time frame to promote Mastif-Games' new title Major League Eating: The Game of which Janus appears as a playable character.

To everyone's surprise, Janus managed to wolf down 14 plates of sushi, totaling 141 pieces, each about the size of a roll of film. The winning guesstimater received $250 in cash while Janus casually sipped some lemonade and played a few rounds of the game with onlookers, including myself who barely managed to take him out in a meatball battle (an event Janus has never won in real life).

The event was timed and sanctioned by Major League Eating to count as an official record for Janus. Janus is the record holder for ramen noodles, tamales, and tiramisu, of which he's eaten four pounds within six minutes back in mid-2005.

We grabbed the contest on video in case you're interested in watching someone consume this much food in one sitting. There's also a set of photos of Janus and the finished plates here.

About the author

Josh Lowensohn joined CNET in 2006 and now covers Apple. Before that, Josh wrote about everything from new Web start-ups, to remote-controlled robots that watch your house. Prior to joining CNET, Josh covered breaking video game news, as well as reviewing game software. His current console favorite is the Xbox 360.

 

Join the discussion

Conversation powered by Livefyre

Don't Miss
Hot Products
Trending on CNET

HOT ON CNET

How well do you know your surge protector?

Whether you're looking to add more outlets, or want to add a layer of protection between your gear and the outside world, here's what you need to know.