T-Mobile Vivacity is a repainted Orange San Francisco 2

The T-Mobile Vivacity is a new £100 Android smart phone on sale today -- it's the Orange San Francisco 2 with a fresh lick of paint.

The T-Mobile Vivacity is a new Android smart phone on sale today for under a hundred pounds. It's the same £99 price tag as the Orange San Francisco 2 -- and the similarities don't end there.

The Vivacity sports a 3.5-inch touchscreen and a 5-megapixel camera. It runs Android 2.3 Gingerbread software, so you can customise the phone to your heart's content, adding your own shortcuts and widgets to the home screen and adding all sorts of apps too.

It stores stuff on a microSD card, so you can have up to 32GB of movies, music and photos on your phone.

While it's got the T-Mobile logo on the front, the Vivacity is built by phone-makers ZTE. And while it's got a slightly different design on the outside, inside it's identical to the San Francisco 2. In a way these phones are a metaphor for the relationship between the two networks. On the surface they're separate, but behind the scenes they're the same company, which is rather misleadingly called Everything Everywhere.

If you ask us, the San Francisco is the sleeker-looking of the two, but maybe you prefer the Vivacity's ropey iPhone impression. 

The T-Mobile Vivacity is available free on a 24-month contract for just £10 per month, or for £100 on pay as you go. The Vivacity comes in vivacious black or white, and it's available from T-Mobile shops and direct from the network from today.

Are you tempted by the Vivacity or San Francisco budget blowers, or is it better to spend a few extra quid for a more powerful Android phone? Tell us your thoughts in the comments or on our Facebook page.

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