Spin-chill a beer in 30 seconds with the Beerouette

A drill-inspired gadget on Kickstarter promises to chill a warm beer in less than a minute.

Chill Bit in action
Chilling out with a Chill Bit. Spin Chill

Perhaps you have experienced the disappointment and despair of plunging your hand into an ice chest and pulling out a still-warm beer. You have a few options. Pop it in the freezer and wait. Plunge it deep into the ice and wait. Or back the Spin Chill Kickstarter and cool off your beer in less than a minute.

There are two different gadgets on offer with Spin Chill. The first is the Chill Bit, a power-drill attachment that fits over the top of a bottle or can. Attach a beer, lay it down sideways in an ice chest, and turn it on. Watch the can spin for a little while, and then open it up and enjoy a cold one. The Beerouette does the same thing as the Chill Bit, but is a standalone gadget that doesn't need a drill to power it.

There is science behind this chilling method. Plunging a can of beer into ice water takes about 10 to 20 minutes to get a good chill. "By spinning the container, convection is introduced to both the inside and the outside of the container, thus increasing the rate of heat transfer and cooling the beverage down at a rate of at least 20 times faster," reads the Spin Chill description.

If you're the kind of person who carries a power drill with you everywhere you go, then the $15 Chill Bit is the way to go. You can choose a can or bottle attachment at that pledge level. A $25 pledge gets you both. One advantage the Chill Bit has over the Beerouette is the sheer impressiveness of using a power tool on a beer.

If you're looking for something more portable, then the $35 Beerouette is a better choice. It runs on four AA batteries.

Of course, these chilling gadgets can be used for other beverages, like sodas. The Beerouette also handles wine bottles, in case you want to project a classier image. You're on your own when it comes to wine-in-a-box, though.

A prototype Beerouette in action. Spin Chill
Featured Video

Why do so many of us still buy cars with off-road abilities?

Cities are full of cars like the Subaru XV that can drive off-road but will never see any challenging terrain. What drives us to buy cars with these abilities when we don't really need them most of the time?

by Drew Stearne