Sony Yuga to be called Xperia Z, source claims

Sony's leaked 'Yuga' handset will be officially called the Xperia Z, according to a tipster.

We've seen a couple of leaks concerning Sony's upcoming flagship handset, but now we're getting word on a possible new name. It's been codenamed the 'Yuga' in the past, but a source over at Android Community is claiming the finished smart phone will be called the Xperia Z, SlashGear reports.

The source also backed up a fair few of the specs we've already heard. Though he or she did say there's one slight change in store.

So, what do we already know? The Xperia Z is said to have a 5-inch screen packing a 1080p resolution, joining the ranks of the HTC Butterfly as well as potential handsets from Samsung and LG next year. Not that that's a bad thing: 1080p in your hand is an enticing prospect, and with screens getting bigger, it should make watching movies on your phone a real treat.

The display will use the same OptiContrast tech as found in the Xperia V and Xperia Tablet S, the source says.

The Xperia Z is also expected to have a quad-core processor inside, clocked at 1.5GHz. It's an Android affair, though the source claims it'll be running 4.2 Jelly Bean, rather than 4.1 as we previously heard.

According to the source, the chassis will be dust- and water-resistant, and have dimensions of 139 x 71 x 7.9mm. That's only marginally fatter than an iPhone 5.

The source said the Xperia Z will have a 12-megapixel camera on the back, which is what we've heard previously.

It does sound pretty cool, with 1080p smart phones looking to be all the rage next year. I reckon it'll make an appearance at CES in January, or Mobile World Congress at the end of February. What do you make of it? Would you want a 1080p screen on your mobile? Let me know in the comments, or on Facebook.

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