SkyDrive.com update aims to put you on easy street

Microsoft's SkyDrive.com site can now display higher-resolution photos and help you more easily share your files with other people.

SkyDrive's new Shared View.
SkyDrive's new Shared View. Microsoft

Microsoft's SkyDrive is available in a variety of flavors -- Windows software, Mac software, mobile app, local folder. But those of you who manage your files directly through the SkyDrive.com site will find several helpful new enhancements.

Described Tuesday in a new Microsoft blog post, one new feature lets you view higher-quality photos in their full resolution. SkyDrive.com now measures the DPI (dots per inch) of your device to show higher-resolution images and thumbnails. That's a nod to newer devices, such as the Nokia Lumia 1020, which can snap a photo at 41 megapixels. You can also now view animated GIF files in their full animation rather than as static images.

You should also find it easier to tweak and sort your SkyDrive photos. You can now manually rotate your photos to make sure they display correctly. And using the All Photos view, you can drill down to view only the photos in a specific folder rather than the entire batch.

Those of you who share your SkyDrive files will discover a few improvements. You can now selectively shared individual files from anywhere on SkyDrive rather than having to share entire folders or individual files within a specific folder. You can also share different files with different people.

A new Shared view lets you see all of the files you've shared in one shot, so you can more easily disable sharing on select files. You can also see the files that other people have shared with you. And when you share a SkyDrive file via e-mail, you can tick on an option for "Recipients can edit," which means anyone can revise that file without having to log into SkyDrive.

Finally, Microsoft's has enhanced SkyDrive's text view specifically for developers. Able to display code for HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, the text view can highlight specific syntax and auto-suggest certain word completions. Developers can even view changes and compare differences as they edit their code.

About the author

Journalist, software trainer, and Web developer Lance Whitney writes columns and reviews for CNET, Computer Shopper, Microsoft TechNet, and other technology sites. His first book, "Windows 8 Five Minutes at a Time," was published by Wiley & Sons in November 2012.

 

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