Sir Norman Parkinson celebrated with Google doodle

The famed photographer has been given his own doodle, on what would've been his 100th birthday.

Legendary British photographer Sir Norman Parkinson has been given his own Google doodle. The fashion snapper would have been 100 years old today.

Parkinson was born in London and attended Westminster School. He shot for Harper's Bazaar and The Bystander magazine before working for the Royal Air Force as a reconnaissance photographer during the Second World War.

When the war ended, Parkinson went back to the world of fashion, shooting for Vogue from 1945 to 1960, and working as associate contributing editor for Queen magazine from 1960 to 1964. From then until his death in 1990, he worked freelance.

Parkinson changed the world of fashion and portrait photography by bringing models out of the stilted studio environment into the outdoors. He also introduced a cheeky sense of humour to the rather staid world of fashion, making personal appearances in a number of his own shots.

He was awarded the Royal Photographic Society's Progress medal and an Honorary Fellowship of The Society in 1981. He also featured in the Royal Mail's set of 'Great Britons' first class stamps this year, which celebrated outstanding individuals across various fields including sport, journalism, music, politics, and the arts.

If you like the doodle, why not buy the t-shirt? Google has opened a doodle store, where you can buy clothing, skateboards, mugs, and other paraphernalia bearing your favourite doodles. Or if you just want to relive some classics, head to the archive, where you can watch an animated film about Freddie Mercury, play with a Moog synthesiser, have a game of Pac-Man, and lots more.

Our sister site CBS met the team behind the doodles too -- have a look and see how much work goes into creating each one.


What's your favourite doodle of all time? Let me know in the comments, or on our Facebook page.

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