Sci-fi wars? Pilots say UFOs knocked out nukes

Seven former U.S. Air Force pilots claim that beings from outer space targeted nuclear missiles and temporarily disabled them to send us a message.

There are those who fear that aliens are bellicose beings, ready to swallow us whole and spit us out towards the moon.

Stephen Hawking appears to be in this pessimistic camp .

However, testimony offered by seven former U.S. Air Force pilots Monday makes me feel giddy with anticipation at contact with beings from afar. For it seems they might be the sort who put the fist into pacifist.

The pilots declared that they had either seen UFOs personally descend on nuclear establishments, or had received related reports from their colleagues.

According to CNN, Robert Hastings, a UFO researcher, declared: "I believe--these gentlemen believe--that this planet is being visited by beings from another world, who for whatever reason have taken an interest in the nuclear arms race which began at the end of World War II."

These pilots described red glowing objects and things that sent beams down from thousands of feet above.

In one incident, at the Malmstrom Air Force Base in Montana in 1967, they claimed that some of the nuclear missiles were temporarily disabled by these beaming beings, according to CNN.

Yet, their conclusion is that whatever it is that exists beyond us wants us to stop our international bickering and get back to simple domestic spats about global warming.

I paraphrase, naturally.

But please listen to the warmly peacenik feelings offered by Hastings at the news conference: "Regarding the missile shutdown incidents, my opinion...is that whoever are aboard these craft are sending a signal to both Washington and Moscow, among others, that we are playing with fire--that the possession and threatened use of nuclear weapons potentially threatens the human race and the integrity of the planetary environment."

The question is, why would extra-terrestrial beings care about how we are choosing to destroy ourselves?

An even bigger question might be: "Well, if they care this much, why don't they just come on down, appear on "60 Minutes" and let us know exactly what it is they think and, even more interestingly, what technology they used to zap out those missiles?"

 

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