Samsung Galaxy S3 teardown shows iPhone 4S camera sensor

The S3 has been given the teardown treatment, and inside is the same CMOS sensor as in the iPhone 4S.

That screwdriver-happy lot over at iFixit have cracked into Samsung's Galaxy S3. And what's this they've found hanging about looking shifty? Why, it's the same Sony backside-illuminated CMOS sensor as seen in the Sony Xperia Arc and iPhone 4S. Hi there!

As expected, the 3.8V, 2,100mAh battery is present and correct, as you can see from the host of pictures that accompany the teardown. Really, this S3 has lost all its dignity.

Once the motherboard has been removed from the inner framework, you can see the inner support frame. (It's probably magnesium, but there's no concrete proof.) Then there's a chip that's not attached to the motherboard, that translates touch inputs into zeroes and ones.

For the really hardcore parts, the iFixit boys hand the reins to the chaps at Chipworks. I won't go into the chips, but suffice to say there's a quick rundown of them all. Then comes news that the 4.8-inch pane of glass is fused to the display, and the display to the S3's frame, so it's effectively one block.

And the Sony BSI sensor is the same as found in the iPhone 4S. A CMOS sensor, it'll help with low-light shots, so handy for those after-hours snaps you thought were a good idea at the time.

The S3 went on sale last week, though there's a shortage of blue models in the UK -- for the next couple of weeks, anyway. Head down to Tesco, and you could pick it up for half price too. Or you could go to a Samsung PIN pop-up store, whatever floats your boat. The S3 fared very well in our tests, with the battery proving particularly impressive.

Have you picked up the S3? What do you make of it? Let me know in the comments, or on our Facebook page.

Featured Video

Behmor's app controlled coffee maker links to the Web for better brewing

The $329 Behmor Connected Coffee Brewer boasts the guts of an SCAA-approved drip coffee maker melded with a Wi-Fi radio, plus Internet links and mobile app control all in the interest of creating better pots of java.

by Brian Bennett