Samsung Galaxy S3 is a pocket doctor with S Health app

Your Samsung Galaxy S3 records, tracks and shares health-related information such as weight, blood pressure, and more.

How are you feeling? Your Samsung Galaxy S3 can now help answer that question with the new S Health app, available today.

S Health records, tracks and shares health-related information like your weight, blood pressure, blood sugar level, and the calorific ins and outs of your diet and exercise.

S Health is compatible with a variety of healthcare sensors such as blood glucose meters, blood pressure monitors and body composition scales. They connect to the phone wirelessly via Bluetooth or by plugging in a USB cable.

You can also manually type in information about what you've eaten and what exercise you've done, as well as what medication you've necked.

Once you've scooped up this data the app makes sense of it with simple graphs or tables. You can then track and chart health readings over time, seeing how your general health improves or monitoring a condition.

If you want to keep friends and family posted on how you're doing, or if you want to motivate yourself via public shaming, the app has social networking options too. Health updates and messages can be posted online to Twitter.

To get the S Health app, open the More Services app on your S3 and you'll see a link to download it to your phone.

A phone that helps your health? Hopefully that'll cancel out the possible risk of cancer from mobile phones. If you want to use technology to improve or maintain your health, check out our best fitness gadgets to help you shift a spare tyre, or take your training to the next level.

Will you try out S Health? What gadgets and online services do you use to keep you in shape? Tell me your thoughts in the comments or on our Facebook page.

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